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Student Writing Models

How do I use student models in my classroom?

student writing template

When you need an example written by a student, check out our vast collection of free student models. Scroll through the list, or search for a mode of writing such as “explanatory” or “persuasive.”

Jump to . . .

Explanatory writing.

  • How Much I Know About Space Explanatory Paragraph
  • My Favorite Pet Explanatory Paragraph
  • Sweet Spring Explanatory Paragraph

Narrative Writing

  • A Happy Day Narrative Paragraph
  • My Trip to Mexico Narrative Paragraph

Creative Writing

  • Happy Easter Story Paragraph
  • Leaf Person Story

Research Writing

  • Parrots Report
  • If I Were President Explanatory Paragraph
  • My Dad Personal Narrative
  • The Horrible Day Personal Narrative

Response to Literature

  • One Great Book Book Review
  • A Fable Story
  • Ant Poem Poem
  • The Missing Coin Story
  • Winter Words Poem
  • Horses Report
  • Ladybugs Report
  • How to Make Boiled Eggs How-To

Persuasive Writing

  • Plastic, Paper, or Cloth? Persuasive Paragraph
  • The Funny Dance Personal Narrative
  • The Sled Run Personal Narrative
  • Hello, Spring! Poem
  • Cheetahs Report

Business Writing

  • Dear Ms. Nathan Email
  • My Favorite Place to Go Description
  • My Mother Personal Essay
  • Rules Personal Essay
  • Shadow Fort Description
  • Adopting a Pet from the Pound Editorial
  • Letter to the Editor Letter to the Editor
  • Ann Personal Narrative
  • Grandpa, Chaz, and Me Personal Narrative
  • Indy’s Life Story Personal Narrative
  • Jet Bikes Personal Narrative
  • The Day I Took the Spotlight Personal Narrative
  • A Story of Survival Book Review
  • Chloe’s Day Story
  • Did You Ever Look At . . . Poem
  • Dreams Poem
  • I Am Attean Poem
  • Sloppy Joes Poem
  • The Civil War Poem
  • The Haunted House Story
  • The Terror of Kansas Story
  • When I Was Upside Down Poem
  • Deer Don’t Need to Flee to Stay Trouble-Free! Report
  • Height-Challenged German Shepherd Report
  • Friendship Definition
  • What Really Matters News Feature
  • Cheating in America Problem-Solution
  • Hang Up and Drive Editorial
  • Musical Arts Editorial
  • Summer: 15 Days or 2 1/2 Months? Editorial
  • A Cowboy's Journal Fictionalized Journal Entry
  • Giving Life Personal Narrative
  • The Great Paw Paw Personal Narrative
  • The Racist Warehouse Personal Narrative
  • Limadastrin Poem
  • The Best Little Girl in the World Book Review
  • How the Stars Came to Be Story
  • Linden’s Library Story
  • My Backyard Poem
  • The Call Poem
  • I Am Latvia Research Report
  • Mir Pushed the Frontier of Space Research Report
  • The Aloha State Research Report
  • The Incredible Egg Observation Report
  • Unique Wolves Research Report
  • Dear Dr. Larson Email

Personal Writing

  • A Lesson to Learn Journal
  • Caught in the Net Definition
  • From Bed Bound to Breaking Boards News Feature
  • If Only They Knew Comparison-Contrast
  • Save the Elephants Cause-Effect
  • Student Entrepreneur Reaches for Dreams of the Sky News Feature
  • Internet Plagiarism Problem-Solution
  • Mosquito Madness Pet Peeve
  • Anticipating the Dream Personal Narrative
  • Huddling Together Personal Narrative
  • H’s Hickory Chips Personal Narrative
  • It’s a Boy! Personal Narrative
  • My Greatest Instrument Personal Narrative
  • Snapshots Personal Narrative
  • Take Me to Casablanca Personal Narrative
  • The Boy with Chris Pine Blue Eyes Personal Narrative
  • The Climb Personal Narrative
  • The House on Medford Avenue Personal Narrative
  • Adam’s Train of Ghosts Music Review
  • Diary of Gaspard Fictionalized Journal Entry
  • My Interpretation of The Joy Luck Club Literary Analysis
  • Mama’s Stitches Poem
  • The KHS Press Play
  • Rosa Parks Research Report
  • The Killer Bean Research Report
  • Mid-Project Report on History Paper Email
  • Vegetarian Lunch Options at Bay High Email

Templates for college and university assignments

Include customizable templates in your college toolbox. stay focused on your studies and leave the assignment structuring to tried and true layout templates for all kinds of papers, reports, and more..

college tools photo

Keep your college toolbox stocked with easy-to-use templates

Work smarter with higher-ed helpers from our college tools collection. Presentations are on point from start to finish when you start your project using a designer-created template; you'll be sure to catch and keep your professor's attention. Staying on track semester after semester takes work, but that work gets a little easier when you take control of your scheduling, list making, and planning by using trackers and planners that bring you joy. Learning good habits in college will serve you well into your professional life after graduation, so don't reinvent the wheel—use what is known to work!

  • Grades 6-12
  • School Leaders

Black History Month for Kids: Google Slides, Resources, and More!

56 Free Printable Writing Paper Templates for Elementary School

Includes 56 free printable pages!

Grab our free massive writing template bundle!

Is there any bigger thrill than watching elementary students grow as writers? From their first words and sentences in kindergarten to full-fledged stories and essays by fifth grade, we love the transformation students make. That’s why we’ve put together this printable writing paper template bundle containing 56 FREE writing pages.

You’ll have everything you need to teach all kinds of writing—from informative to narrative to how-to! All you have to do is submit your email here to save and print your bundle now.

You’ll get basic printable writing paper (with scaffolded support for drawing and writing)

Writing template bundle including printable lined paper.

WeAreTeachers

Whether your students can write a little or a lot, we have basic writing templates you can print, copy, and share! These include basic lined writing paper as well as dotted kindergarten writing paper, which is perfect for helping them practice letters and sight words.

You’ll also get specific writing templates to support different types of writing

The bundle includes templates for narrative writing, informative writing, and how-to writing, as well as a friendly letter template.

Narrative Writing Graphic Organizer

Narrative Writing Graphic Organizer.

You’ll love these printable narrative graphic organizers whenever you need to encourage students to find key details as you guide them through the writing process.

Informational Writing Graphic Organizer

Informational Writing Graphic Organizer.

This printout will help students organize information when they work on nonfiction writing.

Hamburger Writing Graphic Organizer Template

Hamburger Writing Graphic Organizer Template.

What makes a good “hamburger”? This template provides a visual tool to help students create a juicy “paragraph hamburger” to help guide them in writing a topic sentence, detail sentences, and a closing sentence.

Opinion Writing Graphic Organizer

Opinion Writing Graphic Organizer.

This great teaching tool helps students better understand topical thoughts and opinions using justifications and thorough examples.

Letter Writing Paper

You’ll get basic writing pages (with scaffolded support for drawing and writing).

With all of the texting we do, we could probably all benefit from using this letter writing paper for sending actual handwritten messages!

You’ll also receive holiday and seasonal pages in our writing template bundle

Get holiday writing templates (with varied space for writing and drawing) for back-to-school, fall, Halloween, Thanksgiving, winter, Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, spring, and summer.

Free Printable Back-to-School Lined Paper

Free Printable Back-to-School lined paper.

This “Welcome Back!”–themed back-to-school set includes lined paper and multiple picture boxes. It’s great for the first week together in the classroom.

Free Printable Fall Lined Paper

Free Printable Fall Lined Paper.

Encourage students to share their love for fall with this “Hello Autumn!” set that includes lined paper with and without picture boxes.

Free Printable Halloween Lined Paper

Free Printable Halloween Lined Paper.

Use this “Happy Halloween!” set of lined paper for that fun, spooky time of year. Maybe your kids can use the picture boxes for a Halloween contest!

Free Printable Thanksgiving Lined Paper

Free Printable Thanksgiving Lined paper.

The “Happy Thanksgiving!” set is perfect for encouraging students to share all of the things they’re grateful for (bonus points for drawings in the picture boxes!).

Free Printable Winter Lined Paper

Free Printable Winter Lined Paper.

It might be chilly outside but this set of “Hello Winter!” lined paper (with and without picture boxes) will help students welcome the cold season with open arms!

Free Printable Valentine’s Day Lined Paper

Free Printable Valentine's Day Lined Paper.

We L.O.V.E. this “Happy Valentine’s!” printable set. Kids can choose styles with or without picture boxes.

Free Printable St. Patrick’s Day Lined Paper

Free Printable St. Patrick's Day Lined Paper.

You’ll feel lucky to have this “Happy St. Patrick’s!” lined paper in the classroom—it comes with a variety of options.

Free Printable Spring Lined Paper

Free Printable Spring Lined Paper.

How cute are the bees and flowers on this “Hello Spring!” printable lined paper? Choose from plain lined paper or paper with different-size picture boxes.

Free Printable Summer Lined Paper

Free Printable Summer Lined Paper.

The adorable sun on this “Hello Summer!” lined paper (which comes with or without picture boxes) looks as excited as we are about the break!

Ready to start using this printable writing paper bundle?

Download it for free, looking for more writing resources check out our favorite writing anchor charts., have more great resources share in our weareteachers helpline group on facebook..

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Literacy Ideas

Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students

Complete guide to Narrative Writing

MASTERING THE CRAFT OF NARRATIVE WRITING

Narratives build on and encourage the development of the fundamentals of writing. They also require developing an additional skill set: the ability to tell a good yarn, and storytelling is as old as humanity.

We see and hear stories everywhere and daily, from having good gossip on the doorstep with a neighbor in the morning to the dramas that fill our screens in the evening.

Good narrative writing skills are hard-won by students even though it is an area of writing that most enjoy due to the creativity and freedom it offers.

Here we will explore some of the main elements of a good story: plot, setting, characters, conflict, climax, and resolution . And we will look too at how best we can help our students understand these elements, both in isolation and how they mesh together as a whole.

Visual Writing Prompts

WHAT IS A NARRATIVE?

What is a narrative?

A narrative is a story that shares a sequence of events , characters, and themes. It expresses experiences, ideas, and perspectives that should aspire to engage and inspire an audience.

A narrative can spark emotion, encourage reflection, and convey meaning when done well.

Narratives are a popular genre for students and teachers as they allow the writer to share their imagination, creativity, skill, and understanding of nearly all elements of writing.  We occasionally refer to a narrative as ‘creative writing’ or story writing.

The purpose of a narrative is simple, to tell the audience a story.  It can be written to motivate, educate, or entertain and can be fact or fiction.

A COMPLETE UNIT ON TEACHING NARRATIVE WRITING

narrative writing | narrative writing unit 1 2 | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

Teach your students to become skilled story writers with this HUGE   NARRATIVE & CREATIVE STORY WRITING UNIT . Offering a  COMPLETE SOLUTION  to teaching students how to craft  CREATIVE CHARACTERS, SUPERB SETTINGS, and PERFECT PLOTS .

Over 192 PAGES of materials, including:

TYPES OF NARRATIVE WRITING

There are many narrative writing genres and sub-genres such as these.

We have a complete guide to writing a personal narrative that differs from the traditional story-based narrative covered in this guide. It includes personal narrative writing prompts, resources, and examples and can be found here.

narrative writing | how to write quest narratives | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

As we can see, narratives are an open-ended form of writing that allows you to showcase creativity in many directions. However, all narratives share a common set of features and structure known as “Story Elements”, which are briefly covered in this guide.

Don’t overlook the importance of understanding story elements and the value this adds to you as a writer who can dissect and create grand narratives. We also have an in-depth guide to understanding story elements here .

CHARACTERISTICS OF NARRATIVE WRITING

Narrative structure.

ORIENTATION (BEGINNING) Set the scene by introducing your characters, setting and time of the story. Establish your who, when and where in this part of your narrative

COMPLICATION AND EVENTS (MIDDLE) In this section activities and events involving your main characters are expanded upon. These events are written in a cohesive and fluent sequence.

RESOLUTION (ENDING) Your complication is resolved in this section. It does not have to be a happy outcome, however.

EXTRAS: Whilst orientation, complication and resolution are the agreed norms for a narrative, there are numerous examples of popular texts that did not explicitly follow this path exactly.

NARRATIVE FEATURES

LANGUAGE: Use descriptive and figurative language to paint images inside your audience’s minds as they read.

PERSPECTIVE Narratives can be written from any perspective but are most commonly written in first or third person.

DIALOGUE Narratives frequently switch from narrator to first-person dialogue. Always use speech marks when writing dialogue.

TENSE If you change tense, make it perfectly clear to your audience what is happening. Flashbacks might work well in your mind but make sure they translate to your audience.

THE PLOT MAP

narrative writing | structuring a narrative | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

This graphic is known as a plot map, and nearly all narratives fit this structure in one way or another, whether romance novels, science fiction or otherwise.

It is a simple tool that helps you understand and organise a story’s events. Think of it as a roadmap that outlines the journey of your characters and the events that unfold. It outlines the different stops along the way, such as the introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution, that help you to see how the story builds and develops.

Using a plot map, you can see how each event fits into the larger picture and how the different parts of the story work together to create meaning. It’s a great way to visualize and analyze a story.

Be sure to refer to a plot map when planning a story, as it has all the essential elements of a great story.

THE 5 KEY STORY ELEMENTS OF A GREAT NARRATIVE (6-MINUTE TUTORIAL VIDEO)

This video we created provides an excellent overview of these elements and demonstrates them in action in stories we all know and love.

Story Elements for kids

HOW TO WRITE A NARRATIVE

How to write a Narrative

Now that we understand the story elements and how they come together to form stories, it’s time to start planning and writing your narrative.

In many cases, the template and guide below will provide enough details on how to craft a great story. However, if you still need assistance with the fundamentals of writing, such as sentence structure, paragraphs and using correct grammar, we have some excellent guides on those here.

USE YOUR WRITING TIME EFFECTIVELY: Maximize your narrative writing sessions by spending approximately 20 per cent of your time planning and preparing.  This ensures greater productivity during your writing time and keeps you focused and on task.

Use tools such as graphic organizers to logically sequence your narrative if you are not a confident story writer.  If you are working with reluctant writers, try using narrative writing prompts to get their creative juices flowing.

Spend most of your writing hour on the task at hand, don’t get too side-tracked editing during this time and leave some time for editing. When editing a  narrative, examine it for these three elements.

  • Spelling and grammar ( Is it readable?)
  • Story structure and continuity ( Does it make sense, and does it flow? )
  • Character and plot analysis. (Are your characters engaging? Does your problem/resolution work? )

1. SETTING THE SCENE: THE WHERE AND THE WHEN

narrative writing | aa156ee009d91a57894348652da98b58 | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

The story’s setting often answers two of the central questions in the story, namely, the where and the when. The answers to these two crucial questions will often be informed by the type of story the student is writing.

The story’s setting can be chosen to quickly orient the reader to the type of story they are reading. For example, a fictional narrative writing piece such as a horror story will often begin with a description of a haunted house on a hill or an abandoned asylum in the middle of the woods. If we start our story on a rocket ship hurtling through the cosmos on its space voyage to the Alpha Centauri star system, we can be reasonably sure that the story we are embarking on is a work of science fiction.

Such conventions are well-worn clichés true, but they can be helpful starting points for our novice novelists to make a start.

Having students choose an appropriate setting for the type of story they wish to write is an excellent exercise for our younger students. It leads naturally onto the next stage of story writing, which is creating suitable characters to populate this fictional world they have created. However, older or more advanced students may wish to play with the expectations of appropriate settings for their story. They may wish to do this for comic effect or in the interest of creating a more original story. For example, opening a story with a children’s birthday party does not usually set up the expectation of a horror story. Indeed, it may even lure the reader into a happy reverie as they remember their own happy birthday parties. This leaves them more vulnerable to the surprise element of the shocking action that lies ahead.

Once the students have chosen a setting for their story, they need to start writing. Little can be more terrifying to English students than the blank page and its bare whiteness stretching before them on the table like a merciless desert they must cross. Give them the kick-start they need by offering support through word banks or writing prompts. If the class is all writing a story based on the same theme, you may wish to compile a common word bank on the whiteboard as a prewriting activity. Write the central theme or genre in the middle of the board. Have students suggest words or phrases related to the theme and list them on the board.

You may wish to provide students with a copy of various writing prompts to get them started. While this may mean that many students’ stories will have the same beginning, they will most likely arrive at dramatically different endings via dramatically different routes.

narrative writing | story elements | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

A bargain is at the centre of the relationship between the writer and the reader. That bargain is that the reader promises to suspend their disbelief as long as the writer creates a consistent and convincing fictional reality. Creating a believable world for the fictional characters to inhabit requires the student to draw on convincing details. The best way of doing this is through writing that appeals to the senses. Have your student reflect deeply on the world that they are creating. What does it look like? Sound like? What does the food taste like there? How does it feel like to walk those imaginary streets, and what aromas beguile the nose as the main character winds their way through that conjured market?

Also, Consider the when; or the time period. Is it a future world where things are cleaner and more antiseptic? Or is it an overcrowded 16th-century London with human waste stinking up the streets? If students can create a multi-sensory installation in the reader’s mind, then they have done this part of their job well.

Popular Settings from Children’s Literature and Storytelling

  • Fairytale Kingdom
  • Magical Forest
  • Village/town
  • Underwater world
  • Space/Alien planet

2. CASTING THE CHARACTERS: THE WHO

Now that your student has created a believable world, it is time to populate it with believable characters.

In short stories, these worlds mustn’t be overpopulated beyond what the student’s skill level can manage. Short stories usually only require one main character and a few secondary ones. Think of the short story more as a small-scale dramatic production in an intimate local theater than a Hollywood blockbuster on a grand scale. Too many characters will only confuse and become unwieldy with a canvas this size. Keep it simple!

Creating believable characters is often one of the most challenging aspects of narrative writing for students. Fortunately, we can do a few things to help students here. Sometimes it is helpful for students to model their characters on actual people they know. This can make things a little less daunting and taxing on the imagination. However, whether or not this is the case, writing brief background bios or descriptions of characters’ physical personality characteristics can be a beneficial prewriting activity. Students should give some in-depth consideration to the details of who their character is: How do they walk? What do they look like? Do they have any distinguishing features? A crooked nose? A limp? Bad breath? Small details such as these bring life and, therefore, believability to characters. Students can even cut pictures from magazines to put a face to their character and allow their imaginations to fill in the rest of the details.

Younger students will often dictate to the reader the nature of their characters. To improve their writing craft, students must know when to switch from story-telling mode to story-showing mode. This is particularly true when it comes to character. Encourage students to reveal their character’s personality through what they do rather than merely by lecturing the reader on the faults and virtues of the character’s personality. It might be a small relayed detail in the way they walk that reveals a core characteristic. For example, a character who walks with their head hanging low and shoulders hunched while avoiding eye contact has been revealed to be timid without the word once being mentioned. This is a much more artistic and well-crafted way of doing things and is less irritating for the reader. A character who sits down at the family dinner table immediately snatches up his fork and starts stuffing roast potatoes into his mouth before anyone else has even managed to sit down has revealed a tendency towards greed or gluttony.

Understanding Character Traits

Again, there is room here for some fun and profitable prewriting activities. Give students a list of character traits and have them describe a character doing something that reveals that trait without ever employing the word itself.

It is also essential to avoid adjective stuffing here. When looking at students’ early drafts, adjective stuffing is often apparent. To train the student out of this habit, choose an adjective and have the student rewrite the sentence to express this adjective through action rather than telling.

When writing a story, it is vital to consider the character’s traits and how they will impact the story’s events. For example, a character with a strong trait of determination may be more likely to overcome obstacles and persevere. In contrast, a character with a tendency towards laziness may struggle to achieve their goals. In short, character traits add realism, depth, and meaning to a story, making it more engaging and memorable for the reader.

Popular Character Traits in Children’s Stories

  • Determination
  • Imagination
  • Perseverance
  • Responsibility

We have an in-depth guide to creating great characters here , but most students should be fine to move on to planning their conflict and resolution.

3. NO PROBLEM? NO STORY! HOW CONFLICT DRIVES A NARRATIVE

narrative writing | 2 RoadBlock | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

This is often the area apprentice writers have the most difficulty with. Students must understand that without a problem or conflict, there is no story. The problem is the driving force of the action. Usually, in a short story, the problem will center around what the primary character wants to happen or, indeed, wants not to happen. It is the hurdle that must be overcome. It is in the struggle to overcome this hurdle that events happen.

Often when a student understands the need for a problem in a story, their completed work will still not be successful. This is because, often in life, problems remain unsolved. Hurdles are not always successfully overcome. Students pick up on this.

We often discuss problems with friends that will never be satisfactorily resolved one way or the other, and we accept this as a part of life. This is not usually the case with writing a story. Whether a character successfully overcomes his or her problem or is decidedly crushed in the process of trying is not as important as the fact that it will finally be resolved one way or the other.

A good practical exercise for students to get to grips with this is to provide copies of stories and have them identify the central problem or conflict in each through discussion. Familiar fables or fairy tales such as Three Little Pigs, The Boy Who Cried Wolf, Cinderella, etc., are great for this.

While it is true that stories often have more than one problem or that the hero or heroine is unsuccessful in their first attempt to solve a central problem, for beginning students and intermediate students, it is best to focus on a single problem, especially given the scope of story writing at this level. Over time students will develop their abilities to handle more complex plots and write accordingly.

Popular Conflicts found in Children’s Storytelling.

  • Good vs evil
  • Individual vs society
  • Nature vs nurture
  • Self vs others
  • Man vs self
  • Man vs nature
  • Man vs technology
  • Individual vs fate
  • Self vs destiny

Conflict is the heart and soul of any good story. It’s what makes a story compelling and drives the plot forward. Without conflict, there is no story. Every great story has a struggle or a problem that needs to be solved, and that’s where conflict comes in. Conflict is what makes a story exciting and keeps the reader engaged. It creates tension and suspense and makes the reader care about the outcome.

Like in real life, conflict in a story is an opportunity for a character’s growth and transformation. It’s a chance for them to learn and evolve, making a story great. So next time stories are written in the classroom, remember that conflict is an essential ingredient, and without it, your story will lack the energy, excitement, and meaning that makes it truly memorable.

4. THE NARRATIVE CLIMAX: HOW THINGS COME TO A HEAD!

narrative writing | tension 1068x660 1 | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

The climax of the story is the dramatic high point of the action. It is also when the struggles kicked off by the problem come to a head. The climax will ultimately decide whether the story will have a happy or tragic ending. In the climax, two opposing forces duke things out until the bitter (or sweet!) end. One force ultimately emerges triumphant. As the action builds throughout the story, suspense increases as the reader wonders which of these forces will win out. The climax is the release of this suspense.

Much of the success of the climax depends on how well the other elements of the story have been achieved. If the student has created a well-drawn and believable character that the reader can identify with and feel for, then the climax will be more powerful.

The nature of the problem is also essential as it determines what’s at stake in the climax. The problem must matter dearly to the main character if it matters at all to the reader.

Have students engage in discussions about their favorite movies and books. Have them think about the storyline and decide the most exciting parts. What was at stake at these moments? What happened in your body as you read or watched? Did you breathe faster? Or grip the cushion hard? Did your heart rate increase, or did you start to sweat? This is what a good climax does and what our students should strive to do in their stories.

The climax puts it all on the line and rolls the dice. Let the chips fall where the writer may…

Popular Climax themes in Children’s Stories

  • A battle between good and evil
  • The character’s bravery saves the day
  • Character faces their fears and overcomes them
  • The character solves a mystery or puzzle.
  • The character stands up for what is right.
  • Character reaches their goal or dream.
  • The character learns a valuable lesson.
  • The character makes a selfless sacrifice.
  • The character makes a difficult decision.
  • The character reunites with loved ones or finds true friendship.

5. RESOLUTION: TYING UP LOOSE ENDS

After the climactic action, a few questions will often remain unresolved for the reader, even if all the conflict has been resolved. The resolution is where those lingering questions will be answered. The resolution in a short story may only be a brief paragraph or two. But, in most cases, it will still be necessary to include an ending immediately after the climax can feel too abrupt and leave the reader feeling unfulfilled.

An easy way to explain resolution to students struggling to grasp the concept is to point to the traditional resolution of fairy tales, the “And they all lived happily ever after” ending. This weather forecast for the future allows the reader to take their leave. Have the student consider the emotions they want to leave the reader with when crafting their resolution.

While the action is usually complete by the end of the climax, it is in the resolution that if there is a twist to be found, it will appear – think of movies such as The Usual Suspects. Pulling this off convincingly usually requires considerable skill from a student writer. Still, it may well form a challenging extension exercise for those more gifted storytellers among your students.

Popular Resolutions in Children’s Stories

  • Our hero achieves their goal
  • The character learns a valuable lesson
  • A character finds happiness or inner peace.
  • The character reunites with loved ones.
  • Character restores balance to the world.
  • The character discovers their true identity.
  • Character changes for the better.
  • The character gains wisdom or understanding.
  • Character makes amends with others.
  • The character learns to appreciate what they have.

Once students have completed their story, they can edit for grammar, vocabulary choice, spelling, etc., but not before!

As mentioned, there is a craft to storytelling, as well as an art. When accurate grammar, perfect spelling, and immaculate sentence structures are pushed at the outset, they can cause storytelling paralysis. For this reason, it is essential that when we encourage the students to write a story, we give them license to make mechanical mistakes in their use of language that they can work on and fix later.

Good narrative writing is a very complex skill to develop and will take the student years to become competent. It challenges not only the student’s technical abilities with language but also her creative faculties. Writing frames, word banks, mind maps, and visual prompts can all give valuable support as students develop the wide-ranging and challenging skills required to produce a successful narrative writing piece. But, at the end of it all, as with any craft, practice and more practice is at the heart of the matter.

TIPS FOR WRITING A GREAT NARRATIVE

  • Start your story with a clear purpose: If you can determine the theme or message you want to convey in your narrative before starting it will make the writing process so much simpler.
  • Choose a compelling storyline and sell it through great characters, setting and plot: Consider a unique or interesting story that captures the reader’s attention, then build the world and characters around it.
  • Develop vivid characters that are not all the same: Make your characters relatable and memorable by giving them distinct personalities and traits you can draw upon in the plot.
  • Use descriptive language to hook your audience into your story: Use sensory language to paint vivid images and sequences in the reader’s mind.
  • Show, don’t tell your audience: Use actions, thoughts, and dialogue to reveal character motivations and emotions through storytelling.
  • Create a vivid setting that is clear to your audience before getting too far into the plot: Describe the time and place of your story to immerse the reader fully.
  • Build tension: Refer to the story map earlier in this article and use conflict, obstacles, and suspense to keep the audience engaged and invested in your narrative.
  • Use figurative language such as metaphors, similes, and other literary devices to add depth and meaning to your narrative.
  • Edit, revise, and refine: Take the time to refine and polish your writing for clarity and impact.
  • Stay true to your voice: Maintain your unique perspective and style in your writing to make it your own.

NARRATIVE WRITING EXAMPLES (Student Writing Samples)

Below are a collection of student writing samples of narratives.  Click on the image to enlarge and explore them in greater detail.  Please take a moment to read these creative stories in detail and the teacher and student guides which highlight some of the critical elements of narratives to consider before writing.

Please understand these student writing samples are not intended to be perfect examples for each age or grade level but a piece of writing for students and teachers to explore together to critically analyze to improve student writing skills and deepen their understanding of story writing.

We recommend reading the example either a year above or below, as well as the grade you are currently working with, to gain a broader appreciation of this text type.

narrative writing | Narrative writing example year 3 1 | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

NARRATIVE WRITING PROMPTS (Journal Prompts)

When students have a great journal prompt, it can help them focus on the task at hand, so be sure to view our vast collection of visual writing prompts for various text types here or use some of these.

  • On a recent European trip, you find your travel group booked into the stunning and mysterious Castle Frankenfurter for a single night…  As night falls, the massive castle of over one hundred rooms seems to creak and groan as a series of unexplained events begin to make you wonder who or what else is spending the evening with you. Write a narrative that tells the story of your evening.
  • You are a famous adventurer who has discovered new lands; keep a travel log over a period of time in which you encounter new and exciting adventures and challenges to overcome.  Ensure your travel journal tells a story and has a definite introduction, conflict and resolution.
  • You create an incredible piece of technology that has the capacity to change the world.  As you sit back and marvel at your innovation and the endless possibilities ahead of you, it becomes apparent there are a few problems you didn’t really consider. You might not even be able to control them.  Write a narrative in which you ride the highs and lows of your world-changing creation with a clear introduction, conflict and resolution.
  • As the final door shuts on the Megamall, you realise you have done it…  You and your best friend have managed to sneak into the largest shopping centre in town and have the entire place to yourselves until 7 am tomorrow.  There is literally everything and anything a child would dream of entertaining themselves for the next 12 hours.  What amazing adventures await you?  What might go wrong?  And how will you get out of there scot-free?
  • A stranger walks into town…  Whilst appearing similar to almost all those around you, you get a sense that this person is from another time, space or dimension… Are they friends or foes?  What makes you sense something very strange is going on?   Suddenly they stand up and walk toward you with purpose extending their hand… It’s almost as if they were reading your mind.

NARRATIVE WRITING VIDEO TUTORIAL

narrative writing | Copy of Copy of Copy of HOW TO WRITE POEMS | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

Teaching Resources

Use our resources and tools to improve your student’s writing skills through proven teaching strategies.

When teaching narrative writing, it is essential that you have a range of tools, strategies and resources at your disposal to ensure you get the most out of your writing time.  You can find some examples below, which are free and paid premium resources you can use instantly without any preparation.

FREE Narrative Graphic Organizer

narrative writing | NarrativeGraphicOrganizer | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

THE STORY TELLERS BUNDLE OF TEACHING RESOURCES

narrative writing | story tellers bundle 1 | Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students | literacyideas.com

A MASSIVE COLLECTION of resources for narratives and story writing in the classroom covering all elements of crafting amazing stories. MONTHS WORTH OF WRITING LESSONS AND RESOURCES, including:

NARRATIVE WRITING CHECKLIST BUNDLE

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OTHER GREAT ARTICLES ABOUT NARRATIVE WRITING

narrative writing | Narrative2BWriting2BStrategies2Bfor2Bjuniors2B28129 | Narrative Writing for Kids: Essential Skills and Strategies | literacyideas.com

Narrative Writing for Kids: Essential Skills and Strategies

narrative writing | narrative writing lessons | 7 Great Narrative Lesson Plans Students and Teachers Love | literacyideas.com

7 Great Narrative Lesson Plans Students and Teachers Love

narrative writing | Top narrative writing skills for students | Top 7 Narrative Writing Exercises for Students | literacyideas.com

Top 7 Narrative Writing Exercises for Students

narrative writing | how to write a scary horror story | How to Write a Scary Story | literacyideas.com

How to Write a Scary Story

The content for this page has been written by Shane Mac Donnchaidh.  A former principal of an international school and English university lecturer with 15 years of teaching and administration experience. Shane’s latest Book, The Complete Guide to Nonfiction Writing , can be found here.  Editing and support for this article have been provided by the literacyideas team.

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The Beginner's Guide to Writing an Essay | Steps & Examples

An academic essay is a focused piece of writing that develops an idea or argument using evidence, analysis, and interpretation.

There are many types of essays you might write as a student. The content and length of an essay depends on your level, subject of study, and course requirements. However, most essays at university level are argumentative — they aim to persuade the reader of a particular position or perspective on a topic.

The essay writing process consists of three main stages:

  • Preparation: Decide on your topic, do your research, and create an essay outline.
  • Writing : Set out your argument in the introduction, develop it with evidence in the main body, and wrap it up with a conclusion.
  • Revision:  Check your essay on the content, organization, grammar, spelling, and formatting of your essay.

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Table of contents

Essay writing process, preparation for writing an essay, writing the introduction, writing the main body, writing the conclusion, essay checklist, lecture slides, frequently asked questions about writing an essay.

The writing process of preparation, writing, and revisions applies to every essay or paper, but the time and effort spent on each stage depends on the type of essay .

For example, if you’ve been assigned a five-paragraph expository essay for a high school class, you’ll probably spend the most time on the writing stage; for a college-level argumentative essay , on the other hand, you’ll need to spend more time researching your topic and developing an original argument before you start writing.

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Before you start writing, you should make sure you have a clear idea of what you want to say and how you’re going to say it. There are a few key steps you can follow to make sure you’re prepared:

  • Understand your assignment: What is the goal of this essay? What is the length and deadline of the assignment? Is there anything you need to clarify with your teacher or professor?
  • Define a topic: If you’re allowed to choose your own topic , try to pick something that you already know a bit about and that will hold your interest.
  • Do your research: Read  primary and secondary sources and take notes to help you work out your position and angle on the topic. You’ll use these as evidence for your points.
  • Come up with a thesis:  The thesis is the central point or argument that you want to make. A clear thesis is essential for a focused essay—you should keep referring back to it as you write.
  • Create an outline: Map out the rough structure of your essay in an outline . This makes it easier to start writing and keeps you on track as you go.

Once you’ve got a clear idea of what you want to discuss, in what order, and what evidence you’ll use, you’re ready to start writing.

The introduction sets the tone for your essay. It should grab the reader’s interest and inform them of what to expect. The introduction generally comprises 10–20% of the text.

1. Hook your reader

The first sentence of the introduction should pique your reader’s interest and curiosity. This sentence is sometimes called the hook. It might be an intriguing question, a surprising fact, or a bold statement emphasizing the relevance of the topic.

Let’s say we’re writing an essay about the development of Braille (the raised-dot reading and writing system used by visually impaired people). Our hook can make a strong statement about the topic:

The invention of Braille was a major turning point in the history of disability.

2. Provide background on your topic

Next, it’s important to give context that will help your reader understand your argument. This might involve providing background information, giving an overview of important academic work or debates on the topic, and explaining difficult terms. Don’t provide too much detail in the introduction—you can elaborate in the body of your essay.

3. Present the thesis statement

Next, you should formulate your thesis statement— the central argument you’re going to make. The thesis statement provides focus and signals your position on the topic. It is usually one or two sentences long. The thesis statement for our essay on Braille could look like this:

As the first writing system designed for blind people’s needs, Braille was a groundbreaking new accessibility tool. It not only provided practical benefits, but also helped change the cultural status of blindness.

4. Map the structure

In longer essays, you can end the introduction by briefly describing what will be covered in each part of the essay. This guides the reader through your structure and gives a preview of how your argument will develop.

The invention of Braille marked a major turning point in the history of disability. The writing system of raised dots used by blind and visually impaired people was developed by Louis Braille in nineteenth-century France. In a society that did not value disabled people in general, blindness was particularly stigmatized, and lack of access to reading and writing was a significant barrier to social participation. The idea of tactile reading was not entirely new, but existing methods based on sighted systems were difficult to learn and use. As the first writing system designed for blind people’s needs, Braille was a groundbreaking new accessibility tool. It not only provided practical benefits, but also helped change the cultural status of blindness. This essay begins by discussing the situation of blind people in nineteenth-century Europe. It then describes the invention of Braille and the gradual process of its acceptance within blind education. Subsequently, it explores the wide-ranging effects of this invention on blind people’s social and cultural lives.

Write your essay introduction

The body of your essay is where you make arguments supporting your thesis, provide evidence, and develop your ideas. Its purpose is to present, interpret, and analyze the information and sources you have gathered to support your argument.

Length of the body text

The length of the body depends on the type of essay. On average, the body comprises 60–80% of your essay. For a high school essay, this could be just three paragraphs, but for a graduate school essay of 6,000 words, the body could take up 8–10 pages.

Paragraph structure

To give your essay a clear structure , it is important to organize it into paragraphs . Each paragraph should be centered around one main point or idea.

That idea is introduced in a  topic sentence . The topic sentence should generally lead on from the previous paragraph and introduce the point to be made in this paragraph. Transition words can be used to create clear connections between sentences.

After the topic sentence, present evidence such as data, examples, or quotes from relevant sources. Be sure to interpret and explain the evidence, and show how it helps develop your overall argument.

Lack of access to reading and writing put blind people at a serious disadvantage in nineteenth-century society. Text was one of the primary methods through which people engaged with culture, communicated with others, and accessed information; without a well-developed reading system that did not rely on sight, blind people were excluded from social participation (Weygand, 2009). While disabled people in general suffered from discrimination, blindness was widely viewed as the worst disability, and it was commonly believed that blind people were incapable of pursuing a profession or improving themselves through culture (Weygand, 2009). This demonstrates the importance of reading and writing to social status at the time: without access to text, it was considered impossible to fully participate in society. Blind people were excluded from the sighted world, but also entirely dependent on sighted people for information and education.

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The conclusion is the final paragraph of an essay. It should generally take up no more than 10–15% of the text . A strong essay conclusion :

  • Returns to your thesis
  • Ties together your main points
  • Shows why your argument matters

A great conclusion should finish with a memorable or impactful sentence that leaves the reader with a strong final impression.

What not to include in a conclusion

To make your essay’s conclusion as strong as possible, there are a few things you should avoid. The most common mistakes are:

  • Including new arguments or evidence
  • Undermining your arguments (e.g. “This is just one approach of many”)
  • Using concluding phrases like “To sum up…” or “In conclusion…”

Braille paved the way for dramatic cultural changes in the way blind people were treated and the opportunities available to them. Louis Braille’s innovation was to reimagine existing reading systems from a blind perspective, and the success of this invention required sighted teachers to adapt to their students’ reality instead of the other way around. In this sense, Braille helped drive broader social changes in the status of blindness. New accessibility tools provide practical advantages to those who need them, but they can also change the perspectives and attitudes of those who do not.

Write your essay conclusion

Checklist: Essay

My essay follows the requirements of the assignment (topic and length ).

My introduction sparks the reader’s interest and provides any necessary background information on the topic.

My introduction contains a thesis statement that states the focus and position of the essay.

I use paragraphs to structure the essay.

I use topic sentences to introduce each paragraph.

Each paragraph has a single focus and a clear connection to the thesis statement.

I make clear transitions between paragraphs and ideas.

My conclusion doesn’t just repeat my points, but draws connections between arguments.

I don’t introduce new arguments or evidence in the conclusion.

I have given an in-text citation for every quote or piece of information I got from another source.

I have included a reference page at the end of my essay, listing full details of all my sources.

My citations and references are correctly formatted according to the required citation style .

My essay has an interesting and informative title.

I have followed all formatting guidelines (e.g. font, page numbers, line spacing).

Your essay meets all the most important requirements. Our editors can give it a final check to help you submit with confidence.

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An essay is a focused piece of writing that explains, argues, describes, or narrates.

In high school, you may have to write many different types of essays to develop your writing skills.

Academic essays at college level are usually argumentative : you develop a clear thesis about your topic and make a case for your position using evidence, analysis and interpretation.

The structure of an essay is divided into an introduction that presents your topic and thesis statement , a body containing your in-depth analysis and arguments, and a conclusion wrapping up your ideas.

The structure of the body is flexible, but you should always spend some time thinking about how you can organize your essay to best serve your ideas.

Your essay introduction should include three main things, in this order:

  • An opening hook to catch the reader’s attention.
  • Relevant background information that the reader needs to know.
  • A thesis statement that presents your main point or argument.

The length of each part depends on the length and complexity of your essay .

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

A topic sentence is a sentence that expresses the main point of a paragraph . Everything else in the paragraph should relate to the topic sentence.

At college level, you must properly cite your sources in all essays , research papers , and other academic texts (except exams and in-class exercises).

Add a citation whenever you quote , paraphrase , or summarize information or ideas from a source. You should also give full source details in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your text.

The exact format of your citations depends on which citation style you are instructed to use. The most common styles are APA , MLA , and Chicago .

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The Writing Center provides templates for Walden University course papers. These templates are Microsoft Word or PowerPoint files with APA style and Walden-specified formatting. The Office of Research and Doctoral Services provides prospectus forms and templates for doctoral capstone studies. Note that some instructors may require changes to the standard templates and that some of the templates include Walden-specific formatting guidelines that supersede APA style guidelines.

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If you need some extra help with using Microsoft Word, please visit the Academic Skills Center website .

You can also watch the following short videos for an overview on using the course paper template.

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In this EdWeek blog, an experiment in knowledge-gathering, Ferlazzo will address readers’ questions on classroom management, ELL instruction, lesson planning, and other issues facing teachers. Send your questions to [email protected]. Read more from this blog.

How to Help Students With Their Writing. 4 Educators Share Their Secrets

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Teaching students to write is no easy feat, and it’s a topic that has often been discussed on this blog.

It’s also a challenge that can’t have too much discussion!

Today, four educators share their most effective writing lessons.

‘Three Practices That Create Confident Writers’

Penny Kittle teaches first-year writers at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. She was a teacher and literacy coach in public schools for 34 years and is the author of nine books, including Micro Mentor Texts (Scholastic). She is the founder and president of the Book Love Foundation, which annually grants classroom libraries to teachers throughout North America:

I write almost every day. Like anything I want to do well, I practice. Today, I wrote about the wild dancing, joyful energy, and precious time I spent with my daughter at a Taylor Swift concert. Then I circled back to notes on Larry’s question about teaching writers. I wrote badly, trying to find a through line. I followed detours and crossed out bad ideas. I stopped to think. I tried again. I lost faith in my words. I will get there , I told myself. I trust my process.

I haven’t always written this easily or this much. I wouldn’t say I’m a “natural” writer because I don’t believe they exist. Writing is work. When I entered college, I received a C-minus on my first paper. I was stunned. I had never worked at writing: I was a “first drafter,” an “only drafter.” And truthfully, I didn’t know how or what to practice. I was assigned writing in high school and I completed it. I rarely received feedback. I didn’t get better. I didn’t learn to think like a writer; I thought like a student.

I’ve now spent 40 years studying writing and teaching writers in kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, and high school, as well as teachers earning graduate degrees. Despite their age, writers in school share one remarkably similar trait: a lack of confidence. Confidence is a brilliant and fiery light; it draws your eyes, your heart, and your mind. But in fact, it is as rare as the Northern Lights. I feel its absence every fall in my composition courses.

We can change that.

Confidence blooms in classrooms focused on the growth of writers.

This happens in classrooms where the teacher relies less on lessons and more on a handful of practices. Unfortunately, though, in most classrooms, a heap of time is spent directing students to practice “writing-like” activities: restrictive templates for assignments, with detailed criteria focused on rules. Those activities handcuff writers. If you tell me what to do and how to do it, I will focus on either completing the task or avoiding it. That kind of writing work doesn’t require much thinking; it is merely labor.

Practice creating, on the other hand, is harder, but it is how we develop the important ability to let our ideas come and then shaping them into cohesive arguments, stories, poems, and observations. We have misunderstood the power of writing to create thinking. Likewise, we have misunderstood the limitations of narrow tasks. So, here are my best instructional practices that lead to confidence and growth in writers.

1. Writing Notebooks and Daily Revision. Writers need time to write. Think of it as a habit we begin to engage in with little effort, like serving a tennis ball from the baseline or dribbling a basketball or sewing buttonholes. Writers need daily time to whirl words, to spin ideas, to follow images that blink inside them as they move their pen across the page. In my classroom, writing time most often follows engagement with a poem.

Likewise, writers need guidance in rereading their first drafts of messy thinking. I’ve seen teachers open their notebooks and invite students to watch them shape sentences. They demonstrate how small revisions increase clarity and rhythm. Their students watch them find a focus and maintain it. Teachers show the effort and the joy of writing well.

Here’s an example: We listen to a beautiful poem such as “Montauk” by Sarah Kay, her tribute to growing up. Students write freely from lines or images that spring to them as they listen. I write in my notebook as students write in theirs for 4-5 minutes. Then I read my entry aloud, circling subjects and detours ( I don’t know why I wrote so much about my dog, but maybe I have more to say about this … ). I model how to find a focus. I invite students to do the same.

2. Writers Study Writing . Writers imitate structures, approaches, and ways of reaching readers. They read like writers to find possibilities: Look what the writer did here and here . A template essay can be an effective tool to write for a test, but thankfully, that is a very small and insignificant part of the whole of writing for any of us. Real writing grows from studying the work of other writers. We study sentences, passages, essays, and articles to understand how they work, as we create our own.

3. Writers Have Conversations as They Work . When writers practice the skills and embrace the challenges of writing in community, it expands possibilities. Every line read from a notebook carries the mark of a particular writer: the passion, the voice, the experiences, and the vulnerability of each individual. That kind of sharing drives process talk ( How did you think to write about that? Who do you imagine you are speaking to? ), which showcases the endless variation in writers and leads to “writerly thinking.” It shifts conversations from “right and wrong” to “how and why.”

Long ago, at a local elementary school, in a workshop for teachers, I watched Don Graves list on the chalkboard subjects he was considering writing about. He read over his list and chose one. From there, he wrote several sentences, talking aloud about the decisions he was making as a writer. Then he turned to accept and answer questions.

“Why do this?” someone asked.

“Because you are the most important writer in the room,” Don said. “You are showing students why anyone would write when they don’t have to.” He paused, then added, “If not you, who?”

confidenceblooms

Developing ‘Student Voice’

A former independent school English teacher and administrator, Stephanie Farley is a writer and educational consultant working with teachers and schools on issues of curriculum, assessment, instruction, SEL, and building relationships. Her book, Joyful Learning: Tools to Infuse Your 6-12 Classroom with Meaning, Relevance, and Fun is available from Routledge Eye on Education:

Teaching writing is my favorite part of being a teacher. It’s incredibly fun to talk about books with kids, but for me, it’s even more fun to witness students’ skills and confidence grow as they figure out how to use written language to communicate what they mean.

A lesson I used to like doing was in “voice.” My 8th graders had a hard time understanding what I meant when I asked them to consider “voice” in their writing. The best illustration I came up with was playing Taylor Swift’s song “Blank Space” for students. Some students groaned while others clapped. (Doesn’t this always happen when we play music for students? There’s no song that makes everyone happy!) But when they settled down, I encouraged them to listen to the style: the arrangement, her voice as she sang, the dominant instruments.

Then, I played a cover of “Blank Space” by Ryan Adams. Eyes rolled as the song unfurled through the speakers, but again I reminded students to listen to the arrangement, voice, and instruments. After about 60 seconds of the Adams version, heads nodded in understanding. When the music ended and I asked students to explain voice to me, they said it’s “making something your own … like your own style.” Yes!

The next step was applying this new understanding to their own writing. Students selected a favorite sentence from the books they were reading, then tried to write it in their own voice. We did this a few times, until everyone had competently translated Kwame Alexander into “Rosa-style” or Kelly Link into “Michael-style.” Finally, when it was time for students to write their own longer works—stories, personal essays, or narratives—they intentionally used the words and sentence patterns they had identified as their own voice.

I’m happy to report this method worked! In fact, it was highly effective. Students’ papers were more idiosyncratic, nuanced, and creative. The only change to this lesson I’d make now is trying to find a more zeitgeist-y song with the hope that the groans at the beginning die down a little faster.

itsfun

Teaching ELLs

Irina McGrath, Ph.D., is an assistant principal at Newcomer Academy in the Jefferson County school district in Kentucky and the president of KYTESOL. She is also an adjunct professor at the University of Louisville, Indiana University Southeast, and Bellarmine University. She is a co-creator of the ELL2.0 site that offers free resources for teachers of English learners:

Reflecting on my experience of teaching writing to English learners, I have come to realize that writing can be daunting, especially when students are asked to write in English, a language they are learning to master. The most successful writing lessons I have taught were those that transformed the process into an enjoyable experience, fostering a sense of accomplishment and pride in my students.

To achieve this, I prioritized the establishment of a supportive learning environment. At the beginning of each school year, I set norms that emphasized the importance of writing for everyone, including myself as their teacher. I encouraged students to write in English and their native language and I wrote alongside my English learners to demonstrate that writing is a journey that requires hard work and dedication, regardless of age or previous writing experiences. By witnessing my own struggles, my students felt encouraged to persevere.

My English learners understood that errors were expected and that they were valuable opportunities for growth and improvement. This created a comfortable atmosphere where students felt more confident taking risks and experimenting with their writing. Rather than being discouraged by mistakes, they viewed them as steppingstones toward progress.

In my most effective writing lessons, I provided scaffolds such as sentence stems, sentence frames, and word banks. I also encouraged my students to use translation tools to help generate ideas on paper. These scaffolds empowered English learners to independently tackle more challenging writing assignments and nurtured their confidence in completing writing tasks. During writers’ circles, we discussed the hard work invested in each writing piece, shared our work, and celebrated each other’s success.

Furthermore, my most successful writing lessons integrated reading and writing. I taught my students to read like writers and utilized mentor texts to emulate the craft of established authors, which they could later apply to their own writing. Mentor texts, such as picture books, short stories, or articles, helped my students observe how professional writers use dialogue, sentence structure, and descriptive language to enhance their pieces.

Instead of overwhelming students with information, I broke down writing into meaningful segments and taught through mini lessons. For example, we analyzed the beginnings of various stories to examine story leads. Then, collaboratively, my students and I created several leads together. When they were ready, I encouraged them to craft their own leads and select the most appropriate one for their writing piece.

Ultimately, my most effective lessons were those in which I witnessed the joyful smiles on my English learners’ faces as they engaged with pages filled with written or typed words. It is during those moments that I knew my writers were creating and genuinely enjoying their work.

To access a self-checklist that students and EL teachers can use when teaching or creating a writing piece in English, you can visit the infographic at bit.ly/ABC_of_Writing .

iprovided

‘Model Texts’

Anastasia M. Martinez is an English-language-development and AVID Excel teacher in Pittsburg, Calif.:

As a second-language learner, writing in English had not always been my suit. It was not until graduate school that I immersed myself in a vast array of journals, articles, and other academic works, which ultimately helped me find my academic voice and develop my writing style. Now, working as an ESL teacher with a diverse group of middle school multilingual learners, I always provide a model text relevant to a topic or prompt we are exploring.

When students have a model text, it gives them a starting point for their own writing and presents writing as less scary, where they get stuck on the first sentence and do not know how to start.

At the start of the lesson, prior to using a model text, I create a “do now” activity that guides my students’ attention to the topic and creates a relevant context for the text. After students share their ideas with a partner and then the class, we transition to our lesson objectives, and I introduce the model text. We first use prereading strategies to analyze the text, and students share what they notice based on the title, images, and a number of paragraphs. Then, depending on the students’ proficiency level, I read the text to the class, or students read the text as partners, thinking about what the text was mostly about.

After students read and share their ideas with partners and then the whole class, we transition to deconstructing the text. These multiple reengagements with the text help students become more familiar with it, as well as help students build reading fluency.

When deconstructing the model text, I guide my students through each paragraph and sentence. During that time, students orally share their ideas determining the meaning of specific paragraphs or sentences, which we later annotate in the model text using different colored highlighters or pens. Color coding helps visually guide students through similar parts of the model text. For instance, if we highlight evidence in paragraph 2 in one color, we also highlight evidence in the same color in the following paragraph. It helps students see the similarities between the paragraphs and discover the skeleton of the writing. Additionally, color coding helps students during their writing process and revision. Students can check if they used all parts of the writing based on the colors.

Furthermore, one of the essential pieces during deconstructing model texts that I draw my students’ attention to is transition words and “big words,” or academic vocabulary. We usually box them in the text, and I question students about why the author used a particular word in the text. Later, when students do their own writing, they can integrate new vocabulary and transition words, which enhances their vocabulary and language skills.

As the next step, I invite students to co-create a similar piece of writing with a partner or independently using our model text as their guide. Later, our model text serves as a checklist for individual and partner revisions, which students could use to give each other feedback.

Model texts are an essential part of the writing process in any content-area class. As educators, we should embrace the importance of model texts, as they provide a solid foundation upon which students can develop their unique writing skills, tone, and voice.

modeltexts

Thanks to Penny, Stephanie, Irina, and Anastasia for contributing their thoughts!

Consider contributing a question to be answered in a future post. You can send one to me at [email protected] . When you send it in, let me know if I can use your real name if it’s selected or if you’d prefer remaining anonymous and have a pseudonym in mind.

You can also contact me on Twitter at @Larryferlazzo .

Just a reminder; you can subscribe and receive updates from this blog via email . And if you missed any of the highlights from the first 12 years of this blog, you can see a categorized list here .

The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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APA Formatting and Style (7th ed.) for Student Papers

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FREE Student Report Templates & Examples

Do You Need Help In Making A Summary For A Writing Project? You Can Do That With Our Free Student Report Templates. Available On Template.net, We Have Many Samples You Can Choose For Different Types Of Format Whether It Be For College, Internships, Or High School, We Have One For Your Individual Needs.

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Reporting your students' academic progress and assessment results are regular for teachers, whether during preschool, elementary, high school, or college. You consolidate your students' grades to submit or input them in your school's registry system, write them in report cards, and inform the students of their test results or grades. With that in mind, you should use our ready-made Student Report Templates to make reporting writing easier and more convenient. These templates are customizable and available in various file formats, including Microsoft Word , Apple Pages , PDF , Photoshop , and Illustrator . Get them today!

How to Make a Student Report

In this sense, student reports are reports that provide a summary of a student's weekly, monthly, or quarterly grade or progress. Teachers write these reports for record-keeping consolidation and presentation to school stakeholders and parents. Below, we have an easy guide on how to make student reports to help you out.

1.  Determine the Purpose

A student report can be used for various purposes, including grade reporting, internship reports, and progress reports . Therefore, you should first determine its purpose to ensure you can use the proper outline and include the relevant information. 

2. Incorporate School Branding

Student reports are considered school documents ; thus, the need to incorporate images or tokens representing the school to add credibility to the documents. You should include the school name and logo in the reports; if possible, you should also add the school official seal.

3. Add Student Details

Each report should be specially created for each student . Aside from the school identification, you should also include the student's identification details. It is essential to state the name of the student, student number, grade, and section.

4. Include Official Signatories 

You can add credibility to the reports by including official signatories, such as the school principal, grade adviser, department head or counselor, or district supervisor . A signature line should be provided on the bottom part of the report.

Frequently Asked Questions

How frequently should a teacher submit a student report.

The frequency of creating and submitting student reports depends on the requirements of the school or school district. Some schools require the submission of consolidated grades by the end of every quarter, while others require a monthly progress report. 

What are the file formats for student report templates available in template.net?

The website has a wide selection of student report templates that you can download in various file formats, including but not limited to Microsoft Word, Apple Pages, Google Docs, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and PDF. All of these templates are editable and printable using most devices.

How do teachers compute grades?

The most common grade computing system used in schools is grade-point average, which follows a 0 to 4.0 grading scale. The grades are computed by dividing the total earned grade points by the total amount of credit hours.

What type of student reports are commonly used in schools?

Most schools use the following student reports:

1. Accident report 2. Performance report 3. Progress report 4. Internship report 5. Student report card

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Letter of Recommendation Samples for Students

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How To Request a Recommendation Letter

How to write a recommendation letter, what to include in a recommendation letter for a student, how to use letter examples and templates, student recommendation letter example, character / personal recommendation letters, character reference letter example, how to create a reference list, frequently asked questions (faqs).

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Students may need a letter of recommendation to land a job, secure an internship, or earn a spot in a competitive academic program. But to make a good impression on the recipient, a letter of recommendation must be more than just an enthusiastic endorsement—it must follow a specific format.

Whether you are a student who needs a letter of recommendation for an application or a reference writer, here’s how to format your letter and what to include in the document. Plus, you’ll find a few samples to help guide your writing.

Key Takeaways

  • Students can request recommendation letters from teachers, professors, and employers.
  • Character references provide an endorsement of a student’s positive personal qualities, such as their work ethic, dependability, and enthusiasm.
  • When requesting a recommendation letter, offer to provide a copy of your CV and a job description or program overview.

When you request a letter of recommendation (sometimes also called a letter of reference), be sure to remind potential letter writers how they know you and give them information on why you need the letter (for example, tell them the types of job you will be applying for).

You might also provide the person with your most up-to-date resume or CV. These details will make it easier for them to write a personalized and targeted reference letter.

You should also provide all the information the person needs regarding how to submit the letter, what to include (if there are any requirements) and when it is due.

When writing a reference letter , be sure to explain how you know the student, and describe some of the qualities that make him or her a good candidate for the job or school. Use specific examples to demonstrate how the person has shown those qualities.

Focus on the specific job or school the person is applying for. Try to include qualities and examples that will help them get that position or get into that school.

Feel free to ask the person for whom you are writing the letter for more information. You might ask to see the job listing, their resume, or a list of their related coursework.

Contact Information If you’re writing a formal printed letter, include your contact information, as well as the recipient’s information, at the top of the letter.

Greeting If you are writing a personal recommendation letter, include a salutation to start your letter (Dear Dr. Smith, or Dear Ms. Jones, for example).

Paragraph 1: Introduction Explain why you're writing and how you are connected to the person you are recommending, including how you know them, and for how long.

Paragraph 2/3: Why You're Writing Share information on the person you are writing about, including why they are qualified and what they have to offer. It's fine to include more than one paragraph to provide details of the student's academic and work performance. Including examples of how they have excelled is a good way to show how the person is qualified.

Paragraph 4: Summary Write a brief summary of why you are recommending the person. Mention that you "highly recommend" the person or that you "recommend without reservation" or something similar.

Paragraph 5: Conclusion Offer to share more information and let the reader know how to contact you (phone, email, etc.) for a follow-up conversation.

Letter Closing End your letter with a formal letter closing and your name and title. If you are mailing a printed letter, include your signature underneath your typed name: 

Signature (for hard copy letter)

If you’re sending an email, include your contact information in your signature. 

It is a good idea to review recommendation letter examples and templates before you write a recommendation letter or a request for a letter. They can help you decide what kind of content you should include in your document.

A letter template also helps you with the layout of your letter, such as how many paragraphs to include, and how to sign the letter. Templates also show you what elements you need to include in your letter, such as your contact information.

While recommendation letter examples, templates, and guidelines are a great starting point, always tailor a letter to fit the particular situation

Download the recommendation letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

The Balance

Recommendation Letter Example (Text Version)

Brian Smith 123 Main Street Anytown, CA 12345 555-555-5555 brian.smith@collegemail.edu

March 9, 2021

Emma Johnson Owner Café Bistro 72 Dock Street Pacifica, Oregon 97233

Dear Ms. Johnson,

Daniel Williams worked as a server and manager at Central College’s student café under my supervision for seven semesters, beginning in Spring 2019.

Over that time, I was consistently impressed with his customer service and people management skills, as well as his dedication and good humor. I've often said that if I could clone Daniel, I'd never have to worry about staffing problems again. He's a truly gifted server, fast on his feet, and able to remember complicated orders without using an order pad.

He’s also an innovator. Thanks to his suggestions, we revamped the café menu last year to focus on the most popular dishes and dropped some expensive, time-consuming menu items. The result was a 10% increase in profits.

Our customers love him. More than one has suggested that Daniel become a “super senior,” so that he can stay with us next year. Alas, he’s graduating on schedule, with highest honors and a boatload of references to attest to his skill, hard work, and talent. I’m honored to be one of them.

I enthusiastically recommend Daniel for the position of server/manager in your café. If you have any specific questions about Daniel’s experience and skills, I’m happy to help. Please call me at 555-555-5555.

Brian Smith

Student Coordinator

Central College Café

A character reference is a recommendation written by someone who can attest to one’s character. These letters may be needed for people applying to join an association or purchase property.

They can be used as an alternative to a professional reference for someone who doesn't have work experience, and they may also be required for jobs that require a high level of trustworthiness.

Who To Ask for a Character Reference

If you have limited work experience (or worry you will get a negative reference from your former employer), you might ask someone to write you a character reference. This might help balance out a negative employer reference.

Consider asking a friend, neighbor, volunteer or club leader, colleague, or other people who may never have employed you, but can speak to who you are as a person.

What To Include in a Character Reference

If you are asked to write a character reference, focus on the person’s character traits and abilities. You can provide examples from personal interactions with that individual.

Download the character reference letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Character Reference Letter Example (Text Version)

Jane Lee 330 Chestnut Street Kerry Springs, Massachusetts 01006

February 3, 2023

Sandra Gomez Program Director Kids at Play, Inc. Centertown, New Hampshire 03225

Dear Ms. Gomez,

Before I had the pleasure of working with Liz Dwyer on our neighborhood cleanup committee, I was her next-door neighbor for 10 years. It didn’t surprise me at all when she was the youngest person to show up for our initial organizational meeting or when she volunteered to take notes and spearheaded the playground project. 

Liz is a very special young person, the kind that gives you hope for the future. It’s not just that she’s organized and dependable, although she is. It’s that she has passion, drive, and a deep optimism for what’s possible. I’ve seen firsthand how she uses that optimism to inspire others and help them see the possibilities in an empty lot or rundown corner. 

I’ve also been impressed with Liz’s growth as an artist. Since she started at Eastern College, her talent has grown. She has used her new skills to improve our neighborhood, rallying the local kids to help her make a mosaic wall for the new playground. 

I know she would be a bright light in your arts program, inspiring and guiding the kids in your care just as she has the kids on our block. I enthusiastically recommend her for the job. Please feel free to reach out to me at jane.lee@email.com or (413)555-6078 with any questions. 

Best regards,

Jane Lee Director, Chestnut Street Block Association

A reference list is a page with a list of your references and their contact information. Send this letter as part of your job application if it is requested. Employers who ask for a reference list might call or email the people on that list and ask them for more information about you.

When creating your reference list, be sure to first ask permission from each person on your list. Not only is this polite, but this will give each person time to prepare a response for the employer. Make sure you provide all the necessary contact information for each person.

What should a student’s letter of recommendation include?

A letter of recommendation for a student should describe their positive qualities, including their academic achievements, interpersonal skills, work ethic, and character. To be effective, the letter should focus on skills and qualifications that are most valuable in the job or program for which the student is applying. 

How long should a recommendation letter be?

A recommendation letter should be at least a few paragraphs long, typically a page or two in length. It should contain specifics that illustrate why the subject is a good candidate for the job or position they’re seeking. The recommender should unreservedly endorse the subject of the letter. 

Georgetown University Center for Research and Fellowships. " Do's and Don'ts of Writing Recommendation Letters ."

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FFP Poetry Forums

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Teaching Poetry

Templates and examples of structured poem forms, 15 structured poetry forms - templates and examples, examples of templates to use with students of all ages and experience levels. many different structured poetry forms for grades k-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12. when students have a structure to follow, writing poems might feel more manageable. it also allows teachers to share various types of poems with their students..

Tynea Lewis

Structured poems are poems that provide a specific format to follow. They are perfect for those who need a little more help forming a poem. They can easily be implemented in classrooms, no matter the age of the students. Even the youngest of students are able to craft their own poems with the guidance of a teacher.

Before assigning these poems to your students, we encourage you to experiment with the forms as well. You might not see yourself as a poet, but teachers who write help their students become writers who are more willing to share their work.

The poems are arranged by suggested age group. Even if you teach older students, you might want to use the more basic structured poems, especially to get your students more comfortable with crafting their own poems.

Structured poems allow individuals to be creative but still have a safety net that provides help along the way.

Unless otherwise indicated, these poems were written by Tynea Lewis.

HELLO, GOODBYE POEM

Write about a particular season by sharing things you will get to experience during a new season and things that will end from the previous season. To brainstorm, list activities from two different seasons before picking the ideas you will use. Grade Recommendation: K-2, 3-5 Template:

Hello (season). Goodbye (season). Hello… Goodbye… Hello… Goodbye… Hello… Goodbye…
Hello, Spring. Goodbye, Winter. Hello blue sky. Goodbye gray clouds. Hello warm weather. Goodbye snowy nights. Hello playing outside. Goodbye sitting by the fireplace.

Write a poem that describes yourself. Grade Recommendation: K-2, 3-5

I am (one descriptor) I love (something you love) I want (something you want) I play (something you play) I see (something you see each day) I am (one descriptor) I am afraid of (something you’re afraid of) I am happy (something that makes you happy) I am nervous (something that makes you nervous) I am excited (something that makes you excited) I am (one descriptor)
I am playful. I love running. I want a soccer ball. I play outside with friends. I see birds from my window. I am a sister. I am afraid of the dark. I am happy when I sleep in. I am nervous around big dogs. I am excited for summer. I am a friend.

ACROSTIC POEM

Write an acrostic about a specific topic (name, season, subject, sport, etc.) by listing the word vertically and starting each line with a word that begins with each specific letter. Grade Recommendation: K-2 (simple prompt like their name), 3-5

Template: (Write your word/phrase vertically)

A C R O S T I C
Snoring Lullaby Every night Enter dreamland Perfect rest

SEASON IN COLOR POEM

Write a poem about a specific season by describing colors, nouns, and actions associated with that season. Grade Recommendation: K-2, 3-5

Template: 

(Season) (Color) (Noun) (Action) (Action) (Noun) (Color)
Summer Green Grass Running Swimming Pool Blue

The first line of this poem states the topic. The rest of lines include words that describe it, but they all end in -ing.

Grade Recommendation: K-2, 3-6

(Topic) -ing -ing -ing -ing
Sports Playing Running, Jumping, Throwing.

LISTING POEM

Choose a topic to write about, which becomes the first line of the poem. The rest of the poem includes descriptions of that topic. Each line can be one word or a short phrase.

Grade Recommendation: K-2

(Topic) (Description) (Description) (Description) (Description)
Mom Smart Funny Caring Pretty Loves to cook

Write a poem about how a color is perceived through the five senses.

Grade recommendation: 3-5, 6-8

(color) looks like… It sounds like… The color (color) smells like… It tastes like… (color) feels like...

Example: 

Red looks like the embers smoldering in the fire. It sounds like the shrill of an ambulance siren. The color red smells like a fresh cut apple. It tastes like warm cherry pie. Red feels like a fever when you’re sick.

Write a five lined poem that either follows a specific word or syllable count.

Template (word count):

Line 1- noun Line 2- 2 adjectives Line 3- 3 -ing words Line 4- a phrase Line 5- another word for the noun from line 1 (synonym or sums it up)

Example (word count):

Pool Clear, cool Splashing, jumping, swimming Perfect for a hot summer’s day. Fun

Template (Syllable count):

Syllable Count: Line 1-2 syllables Line 2- 4 syllables Line 3- 6 syllables Line 4- 8 syllables Line 5- 2 syllables

A tanka is another form of Japanese poetry that follows a specific syllable count (like a haiku). Grade recommendation: 3-5, 6-8

Line 1- 5 syllables Line 2- 7 syllables Line 3- 5 syllables Line 4- 7 syllables Line 5- 7 syllables
One diamond dewdrop Sparkles in morning sunlight Then, slowly drips down A dandelion's green stem Nourishing its thirsty roots.

(written by Paul Holmes )

Write a poem that uses a string of words to describe one topic or two that are opposing. The end result looks like a diamond. Grade recommendation: 6-8

Line 1: 1 word (subject/noun)  Line 2: 2 adjectives that describe line 1  Line 3: 3 -ing words that relate to line 1  Line 4: 4 nouns (first 2 relate to line 1, last 2 relate to line 7--if you're writing about opposite topics)  Line 5: 3 -ing words that relate to line 7  Line 6: 2 adjectives that describe line 7  Line 7: 1 word (subject/noun)
                     Noise              Loud, Boisterous     Deafening, Earsplitting, Piercing     Clamor, Sound ..... Hush, Quiet     Soothing, Calming, Consoling            Peace, Tranquility                     Silence

(written by Divine Tan )

A nonet is a poem that has nine lines and follows a specific syllable count for each line. The first one starts with nine syllables. The second line has eight syllables. This progression continues until the last line only has one syllable. Grade recommendation: 6-8, 9-12

Line 1 - 9 syllables Line 2 - 8 syllables Line 3 - 7 syllables Line 4 - 6 syllables Line 5 - 5 syllables Line 6 - 4 syllables Line 7 - 3 syllables Line 8 - 2 syllables Line 9 - 1 syllables
I have never felt like this before. He consumes my thoughts every day. He is completely perfect. The way he looks at me Makes my heart do flips. I know it’s true, I hope so. He wants Me.

A sonnet is a 14 line poem that is made up of stanzas of varying lengths and rhyme schemes. Grade recommendation: 9-12

Read more about the sonnet variations and how they are structured.

The days go by, then a month, then a year, and still through the days I see not a change. No matter what happens, you still aren't here, and how you just disappeared is what's strange. No explanation, no warning, just gone. I wish I had just some of your courage to go leave one rainy morning at dawn, to leave one day without any message. How I long for somewhere to be renewed or to just disappear, just not to be, not to see, not to feel, not to hear you, the ghost that you are, which I long to be. But as many days that I want to go, there are more that I want to stay and know.

(written by GA Thompson )

A sestina is a poem that contains six stanzas that each contain six lines and an ending tercet (3 line stanza). It is based on its repetition of the ending words of the lines.

Grade recommendation: 9-12

The numbers indicate the different stanzas that make up the sestina, and the letters stand for the last word of each line.

As the poem continues, the ending words from the lines of the first stanza are repeated at the end of the lines to follow (using the structure indicated below).

1. ABCDEF 2. FAEBDC 3. CFDABE 4. ECBFAD 5. DEACFB 6. BDFECA 7. (envoi) ECA or ACE

Sestina by Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979)

September rain falls on the house. In the failing light, the old grandmother sits in the kitchen with the child beside the Little Marvel Stove, reading the jokes from the almanac, laughing and talking to hide her tears. She thinks that her equinoctial tears and the rain that beats on the roof of the house were both foretold by the almanac, but only known to a grandmother. The iron kettle sings on the stove. She cuts some bread and says to the child, It's time for tea now; but the child is watching the teakettle's small hard tears dance like mad on the hot black stove, the way the rain must dance on the house. Tidying up, the old grandmother hangs up the clever almanac on its string. Birdlike, the almanac hovers half open above the child, hovers above the old grandmother and her teacup full of dark brown tears. She shivers and says she thinks the house feels chilly, and puts more wood in the stove. It was to be, says the Marvel Stove. I know what I know, says the almanac. With crayons the child draws a rigid house and a winding pathway. Then the child puts in a man with buttons like tears and shows it proudly to the grandmother. But secretly, while the grandmother busies herself about the stove, the little moons fall down like tears from between the pages of the almanac into the flower bed the child has carefully placed in the front of the house. Time to plant tears, says the almanac. The grandmother sings to the marvelous stove and the child draws another inscrutable house.

The basis of a villanelle is created by using two sets of rhyming words and the repetition of two lines. It is made up of five tercets (3 line stanzas) and an ending quatrain (4 line stanza).

A and B stand for the rhyme scheme. All the lines that have an “A” will rhyme with each other, as do all the lines that have a “B.” A1 and A2 are the lines that are repeated throughout the poem.

The rest of the poem is structured around the repeated lines.

A1 B A2 A B A1 A B A2 A B A1 A B A2 A B A1 A2
No one told me about this pain. Everything hurts, even my pride. It's these emotions I am forced to contain. Tears have fallen from my eyes like a steady rain. Nothing can take back those nights I've cried. No one told me about this pain. My feelings I cannot even explain. To you, my heart was open wide. Now it's these emotions I have to contain. I'm at the point where I feel nothing but shame Because I thought you were going to be my guide. If only I was warned about this pain. With you is where I wanted to remain. Now I have to continue on with a long stride, But these emotions I am forced to contain. Please tell me our relationship was not in vain. I hope to not regret having tried. No one told me about this pain. It's these emotions I am forced to contain.

A palindrome is a word, phrase, or poem that reads the same forward or backward.

Template suggestion:

When writing a palindrome, try writing the first and last lines and then working your way toward the middle. This will help you know if the poem is making sense.

Softly gliding Spiraling, twirling, floating Leaves fall Crunching Fall leaves Floating, twirling, spiraling Gliding softly

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TOEFL iBT ®  Test

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1 Source: Statistics gathered from 765 users who also took the TOEFL iBT test (China, India, and the U.S.)

2 Source: Survey of 765 users across China, India and the U.S.

IMAGES

  1. 10 Best Printable Primary Writing Paper Template PDF for Free at Printablee

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  4. first grade writng paper template with picture

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VIDEO

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  6. How to use to writing templates in writing task 2

COMMENTS

  1. Free, Downloadable Educational Templates for Students

    Academic writing Free, Downloadable Educational Templates for Students Free, Downloadable Educational Templates for Students Published on June 16, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on July 23, 2023. We have designed several free templates to help you get started on a variety of academic topics.

  2. Free custom printable handwriting worksheet templates

    Teach students how to achieve their legible and signature handwriting by preparing eye-catching practice worksheets you can edit and print from Canva's free templates. Skip to end of list Skip to start of list 924 templates Create a blank Handwriting Worksheet Black and White Writing Sheet Words Foundational Worksheet

  3. Student Writing Models

    Student Writing Models | Thoughtful Learning K-12 Teacher's Guides Student Models How do I use student models in my classroom? Student Models When you need an example written by a student, check out our vast collection of free student models. Scroll through the list, or search for a mode of writing such as "explanatory" or "persuasive."

  4. Templates for college and university assignments

    Home College tools Templates for college and university assignments Include customizable templates in your college toolbox. Stay focused on your studies and leave the assignment structuring to tried and true layout templates for all kinds of papers, reports, and more. Category Color Create from scratch Show all

  5. 56 Free Printable Writing Paper Templates for Elementary School

    Whether your students can write a little or a lot, we have basic writing templates you can print, copy, and share! These include basic lined writing paper as well as dotted kindergarten writing paper, which is perfect for helping them practice letters and sight words. You'll also get specific writing templates to support different types of writing

  6. Sample papers

    The following two sample papers were published in annotated form in the Publication Manual and are reproduced here as PDFs for your ease of use. The annotations draw attention to content and formatting and provide the relevant sections of the Publication Manual (7th ed.) to consult for more information.. Student sample paper with annotations (PDF, 4.95MB)

  7. A step-by-step guide for creating and formatting APA Style student papers

    This article walks through the formatting steps needed to create an APA Style student paper, starting with a basic setup that applies to the entire paper (margins, font, line spacing, paragraph alignment and indentation, and page headers). It then covers formatting for the major sections of a student paper: the title page, the text, tables and ...

  8. Narrative Writing: A Complete Guide for Teachers and Students

    Narratives are a popular genre for students and teachers as they allow the writer to share their imagination, creativity, skill, and understanding of nearly all elements of writing. We occasionally refer to a narrative as 'creative writing' or story writing. The purpose of a narrative is simple, to tell the audience a story.

  9. How to Structure an Essay

    Chronological structure. The chronological approach (sometimes called the cause-and-effect approach) is probably the simplest way to structure an essay. It just means discussing events in the order in which they occurred, discussing how they are related (i.e. the cause and effect involved) as you go. A chronological approach can be useful when ...

  10. The Beginner's Guide to Writing an Essay

    Come up with a thesis. Create an essay outline. Write the introduction. Write the main body, organized into paragraphs. Write the conclusion. Evaluate the overall organization. Revise the content of each paragraph. Proofread your essay or use a Grammar Checker for language errors. Use a plagiarism checker.

  11. APA Sample Paper

    Note: This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style can be found here. Media Files: APA Sample Student Paper , APA Sample Professional Paper This resource is enhanced by Acrobat PDF files. Download the free Acrobat Reader

  12. Overview

    The Writing Center provides templates for Walden University course papers. These templates are Microsoft Word or PowerPoint files with APA style and Walden-specified formatting. The Office of Research and Doctoral Services provides prospectus forms and templates for doctoral capstone studies. Note that some instructors may require changes to ...

  13. Student Writing Templates Teaching Resources

    student writing templates 180,000+ results Sort: Relevance View: High School Student Resume Builder Writing Packet Guide w/ Google Docs™ Template by Creativity and Assessment in ELA 5.0 (25) $4.00 Zip Activity This product is ideal for students who still do not have much work experience.

  14. How to Help Students With Their Writing. 4 Educators Share Their

    Real writing grows from studying the work of other writers. We study sentences, passages, essays, and articles to understand how they work, as we create our own. 3. Writers Have Conversations as ...

  15. APA Formatting and Style (7th ed.) for Student Papers

    Download this Word document, fill out the title page and get writing! Sample Paper APA 7th ed. Our APA sample paper shows you how to format the main parts of a basic research paper.

  16. PDF Annotated Examples of Student Writing

    Student 1 Grade 2. This student exhibits an advanced high level of second language writing proficiency at the second grade level. This collection contains writing about the student and his or her family as well as writing about science, math, and other school subjects. In paper 1, the student presents the step-by-step process of planting a seed.

  17. Penguin Craft & Writing Template

    This resource download includes a printable penguin writing craft template perfect for blending curriculum and art! The template allows students to write informational reports about penguins, covering topics such as habitat, diet, behavior, and adaptations. This encourages research skills and helps engage students by providing a medium for ...

  18. FREE Student Report Templates & Examples

    FREE Student Report Templates & Examples Do You Need Help In Making A Summary For A Writing Project? You Can Do That With Our Free Student Report Templates. Available On Template.net, We Have Many Samples You Can Choose For Different Types Of Format Whether It Be For College, Internships, Or High School, We Have One For Your Individual Needs.

  19. 2 Free Printable Journal Pages for Students

    2 Free Printable Journal Pages for Students Get Your Free Printable Journal Pages for Students— Get your fun and free journal page printables here. Yes! These printable journal pages and journaling templates were designed for you to share with your precious child, students, or homeschooler. Plus…

  20. Student CV Examples, Writing Tips, and Template

    CV Examples for Students. Whether you're a high school student applying for an internship or a recent college graduate looking for your first job out of college, you'll need a compelling student CV to accompany your application. Below, we've included several CV examples, a template, and writing tips for students, each useful for different ...

  21. Letter of Recommendation Samples for Students

    If you are writing a personal recommendation letter, include a salutation to start your letter (Dear Dr. Smith, or Dear Ms. Jones, for example). Paragraph 1: Introduction. Explain why you're writing and how you are connected to the person you are recommending, including how you know them, and for how long. Paragraph 2/3: Why You're Writing.

  22. 46 Editable Rubric Templates (Word Format) ᐅ TemplateLab

    Teaching / Rubric Templates 46 Editable Rubric Templates (Word Format) A grading rubric template is a type of tool used for assessment. You can use it to express your expectations regarding the work of your students. In it, you'll define what you will assess. You'll also describe the criteria for how you will evaluate their work.

  23. Templates And Examples Of Structured Poem Forms

    15 Structured Poetry Forms - Templates And Examples. Examples of templates to use with students of all ages and experience levels. Many different Structured Poetry Forms for Grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12. When students have a structure to follow, writing poems might feel more manageable. It also allows teachers to share various types of poems with ...

  24. Peer Review Templates

    The following templates propose criteria your students can use to assess their peers' work and to provide constructive open-ended feedback. Ideally, these criteria will reflect how you intend to grade. We have focused on two types of assignments: a writing-intensive assignment and a class presentation. Framing negatives as actionable ways the st...

  25. TOEFL TestReady

    No other English language test provider has a prep offering like this — designed for you, with you. TOEFL ® TestReady ™ combines the best TOEFL iBT prep offerings with exclusive features and deeper insights to enhance your English communication skills. All feedback, recommendations, personalized insights and tips are developed by the same teams that write and produce the TOEFL iBT test.