Book Title Generator

10,000+ good book titles to inspire you..

Generate a random story title that’s relevant to your genre. You can pick between fantasy, crime, mystery, romance, or sci-fi. Simply click the button below to get started.

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How to come up with book title ideas.

Need an original book title, and fast? We got you. Here are 8 ways to come up with book title ideas. 

1. Start free writing to find keywords

Write absolutely anything that comes into your head: words, phrases, names, places, adjectives — the works. You’ll be surprised how much workable content comes out from such a strange exercise.

2. Experiment with word patterns

Obviously, we’re not advocating plagiarism, but try playing around with formats like:

“The _____ of _______”
“______ and the _____”

These will work for certain genres, though they are by no means the only patterns you can play around with. Have you noticed how many blockbuster thrillers these days feature the word “woman” or “ girl” somewhere in the title?

3. Draw inspiration from your characters 

If your central character has a quirky name or a title (like Doctor or Detective) you can definitely incorporate this into your book title. Just look at Jane Eyre, Percy Jackson, or Harry Potter, for instance — working with one or more or your characters’ names is a surefire way to get some title ideas down. Equally, you can add a little detail, like Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure, to add a little color to a name and make it title-worthy.

4. Keep your setting in mind

Is your book set somewhere particularly interesting or significant? Even if your title isn’t just where the action takes place (like Middlemarch by George Eliot), it’s something to have in the back of your mind. You can include other details, like The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum or Picnic at Hanging Rock by Joan Lindsay, to give your readers a sense of action and character, as well as setting (which tend to be linked).

5. Look for book title ideas in famous phrases 

Think Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird here — this is a central symbol and significant piece of dialogue in the novel. It’s enigmatic (what does it even mean? Is it a warning? An instruction?) and makes us really sit up when these words appear in the text itself. Try and think of your inspiration for writing your book or sum up your central theme in a few words, and see if these inspire anything.

6. Analyze the book titles of other books

You might be surprised at how many books refer to other works in their titles ( The Fault in Our Stars by John Green comes from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar , and Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men takes its inspiration from a Robert Burns poem). Going this route allows authors to use an already beautiful and poetic turn of phrase that alludes to a theme in their own book. From Ernest Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls to Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials , so many books have used this technique that might also work for you.

7. Don’t forget the subtitle

In non-fiction publishing, there’s a trend of evocative or abstract titles, followed by a subtitle that communicates the content (and is packed with delicious keywords that the Amazon search engine can’t resist). This is also another way to get around long titles — and to add a little panache to an otherwise dry subject matter. In the United States, it’s also quite common to have “A Novel” as a subtitle (if, you know, it’s a novel). In the United Kingdom, this practice is much rarer.

8. Generate a book name through a book title generator

If you’ve gone through all of the above and are still wringing out your brain trying to come up with the golden formula — fear not! There are other ways to get the cogs whirring and inspiration brewing, such as title generators.

And speaking of cogs whirring, let us present you with the...

15 best book titles of all time

Witty, eye-catching, memorable — these famous book titles have it all. Without further ado, here are 15 best book titles you can take inspiration from.

  • I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
  • East of Eden by John Steinbeck
  • The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
  • Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
  • Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barrett
  • Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith
  • The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
  • Are You There, Vodka? It's Me, Chelsea by Chelsea Handler
  • And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  • The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger
  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  • Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown
  • The Man Who Was Thursday by G.K. Chesterton

Looking for even more story title ideas?

If you’re agonizing over your book title, you’re not alone! Some of the best book titles today emerged only after much teeth gnashing. The Sun Also Rises was once titled Fiesta ; Pride and Prejudice was once First Impressions . Then there was F. Scott Fitzgerald, who reportedly took forever to think of a good title. He ultimately discarded a dozen ( Gold-Hatted Gatsby , The High-Bouncing Lover , and Trimalchio in West Egg included) before reluctantly picking The Great Gatsby .

So it’s tough out there for a novelist, which is why we built this generator: to try and give you some inspiration. Any of the titles that you score through it are yours to use. We’d be even more delighted if you dropped us the success story at [email protected] ! If you find that you need even more of a spark beyond our generator, the Internet’s got you covered. Here are some of our other favorite generators on the web:

Fantasy Book Title Generators : Fantasy Name Generator , Serendipity: Fantasy Novel Titles

  • Sci-Fi Novel Title Generators : Book Title Creator , Story Title Generator

Romance Book Title Generators : Romance Title Generator

Crime Book Title Generators : Tara Sparling’s Crime Thriller Titles , Ruddenberg’s Generator

Mystery Novel Title Generators : The Generator .

Or if you think that generators are fun and all — but that you’d rather create your own book title? Great 👍 Kick off with this post, which is all about how to choose your book title . And once you've got the words down, make sure you capitalize your title correctly .

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Book title generator.

Find the perfect title for your nonfiction or fiction book with our Book Title Generator. Save time and unleash your creativity by generating a unique and captivating title tailored to your target audience.

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Why use a book title generator tool?

Do you need help coming up with a title for your book? Have too many ideas and need help narrowing it down? Our book title generator tool can help!

It will create a working title that sets the stage for your book, with the ability to instantly come up with 1000s of variations to choose from. Simply follow the prompts on the tool and click “Generate” to get your title and subtitle ideas. Use it as many times as you need to come up with new combinations and get the creative juices flowing. 

No book (yet)? No problem! 

You can use our title generator for book inspiration. For many, having an initial idea for their book title inspires them to get started. But for others, it is a daunting task that towers over the actual act of writing their book. 

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How to craft the perfect book title (with a generator tool)

When people ask us how to write a book , we help them break it down into smaller, achievable steps. And one of those early steps is creating a working title.

A “working” title is meant to be used as a placeholder when you first start writing your book. And a quick way to craft one is with a book title generator.

Here are some tips for using an AI book title generator to come up with the winning book title ideas:

1. Start with a few specific words or phrases

A great nonfiction book title should reflect what the book is about, what the person will learn, or the end result they’ll achieve after reading your book.

Fiction books aren’t as straightforward. It’s a creative process that requires establishing the style and tone you want for your title and book cover – and then using a book title generator to help you rapidly test different word combinations, phrases, and title lengths.

2. Do some research within your genre

Search for other books in your genre and subgenre, taking note of the types of titles and trends you see. Which are you drawn to? Do they include a lot of adjectives? Are they long or short? This will help you create a running list of the type of title format you want, and help you steer clear of title formats you want to avoid.

If you aren’t sure about your genre, you can use a list of book genres to find where your story is best aligned.

3. Get inspiration from your characters, setting, or location

Many books have been named after the hero (think: Harry Potter, Oliver Twist , or Macbeth ), the location in which the story or a significant scene occurs ( The Wizard of Oz ), or something that makes a character stand out ( The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo ). A unique name or fantasy world can create intrigue and mystery in your book title.

4. Use – or imply – foreshadowing

They Both Die at the End tells the reader what’s going to happen before they even turn to the first page. But that’s part of the reason you want to pick it up. How could the author possibly surprise you after spoiling the ending?

Meanwhile, titles like The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King or As I Lay Dying , aren’t as obvious but still pull you in.

5. Consider your audience

Writing a YA book title is different from writing an adult high fantasy book title. That’s why our book title generator asks who your audience is. It will help you brainstorm an age (and genre) appropriate title for your book.

6. Draft a book description

A description will give the book title generator tool keywords and context, resulting in more specific titles.

Understanding how to write a book description that captures someone’s attention and draws them into the story is an art form in itself. It’s like the trailer of your book. And should be intentionally thought out before you publish and market your book. But at this point in the journey, you don’t need to have your description in its final form.

7. Input everything into the book title generator tool

While it’s certainly not required, taking the time to think about all of the above points will help you create stronger inputs for the AI book title generator. Changing the different things you choose to highlight in the tool’s fields will give you a wide mix of titles. You could even come up with 1000’s of book titles (though we don’t recommend that)!

8. Choose between your top three ideas

We recommend using the “Generate” button on the book title generator until you find a couple of possible working titles. You don’t want to give yourself so many options that you are overwhelmed, but 3-4 solid working book titles are just enough to help you move on to the rough draft .

Related: How to Title a Book

Remember that the first milestone for writing a book is getting (imperfect) words on paper.

Then, when you actually write your entire book and complete it, you can revisit the idea of your book title and dig more into how to subtitle your book . You will have a more fine-tuned approach as to what your book title should include, and you’ll be better prepared to hone in on your best-selling idea.

As a self-published author, your title is not set in stone. In fact, many independent authors change their book titles even after they have published their book; they simply release their book with a new title name, especially if they discover after publication that the original isn’t effective in communicating what the book is about.

So, ready to get started?

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5 Tips for Writing eBook Titles That Get Downloads

Updated April 21, 2020: Your prospective B2B SaaS customers often have only an ebook title and cover to base their decision on when considering whether to download your ebook—so these elements need to make an impact. The best ebook titles are strong, persuasive and benefit-driven.

eBook titles that resonate

Put yourself in your reader’s shoes as you develop your ebook title. Ask yourself:

  • Is this ebook worth the time to read (or skim through)? 
  • Is this ebook worth the cost of handing over my email address?
  • What benefits does this ebook offer over other ebooks?

Your ebook title acts as a first impression and can make or break a potential relationship with your reader. You should craft your ebook title to illustrate the value the content will deliver to your reader or the problem it’ll solve for them.

How to write the best ebook titles

Here are a few tips on how to write powerful and effective ebook titles:

1. Show your audience what’s in it for them

After putting yourself in your reader’s shoes, you need to follow through and deliver value. The best ebook titles show your audience how the ebook will benefit them and what they’ll gain as a result.

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2. Grab their attention

When an ebook title resonates with someone or they can see themselves benefiting from the information, they’re more likely to download the content. This is why your ebook title should use words that make people feel inspired, excited or motivated.

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3. Be clear and concise

If readers don’t understand your ebook title, they won’t be interested in what’s inside. Avoid convoluted and wordy titles to ensure your readers can quickly and easily figure out what they’re going to get inside the ebook.

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4. Consider using a subtitle

Sometimes your ebook title will be short, catchy and memorable, but it may not provide enough information to really communicate what the ebook is about. You can add a subtitle to give your ebook title breathing room while providing further context on what’s inside. Remember, a subtitle should also be clear and concise.

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5. Brainstorm ebook title ideas

Don’t settle. You should give as much care and attention to your ebook title as you would to any other aspect of the content. If you’re unsure of how your audience will react to the title, show it to others to see their first impression. If they’re confused or uninspired to read the ebook, head back to the drawing board.

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Get help with your ebooks

An expert content creation partner can help you create compelling ebooks with the best ebook titles to use across multiple marketing channels. Uplift Content has the strategic expertise to deliver ebooks that will resonate with your customers. Explore our ebook writing services .

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As the founder of Uplift Content, Emily leads her team in creating done-for-you case studies, ebooks and blog posts for high-growth SaaS companies like ClickUp, Calendly and WalkMe. Connect with Emily on Linkedin

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Home / Guides / Book Publishing / How to Title a Book: 13 Steps to Choosing a Title That Sells

How to Title a Book: 13 Steps to Choosing a Title That Sells

  • Do book titles matter?
  • What’s in a bestselling book title? 4 Crucial Book Title Elements
  • Amazon Rules and Requirements for Book Titles
  • 13 Steps to Choosing Your Book Title
  • Good Book Titles: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

To write the title of a book, craft a title that is:

  • Enticing to potential readers
  • Relevant to your genre
  • Relevant to your story
  • Search engine friendly

Lots of writers struggle with how to title their book. There’s no shame in grappling with what your book title should be. It can be overwhelming to sum up your book in 1-5 words.

Second only to your book's cover design , good book title ideas can lead to sales conversions and high discoverability on Amazon.

Having worked with publishing companies and multiple The New York Times bestselling authors, I've been a part of the NYT bestselling titling process on many occasions.

To help you craft the perfect title of your book, I’ll go through 13 actionable steps to choose a title that sells, as well as the crucial elements that every good title needs.add a subtitle

  • Good book titles and why they work
  • 4 crucial elements of the perfect book title
  • Proven step-by-step process on how to title a book [13 steps]
  • Advanced resources and tactics to help

Links in this article may earn me some commission if you use them to purchase products. There’s NO extra cost to you! I like to think of it as my coffee fund, fueling me to create articles like this one for you.

Yes, having the right book title matters because having a poor title hurts your sales, reaches the readers, and hinders your book marketing efforts .

Let’s look at a prime example of why book titles matter, from the book titling genius Emanuel Haldeman-Julius and his famous title experiments .

Haldeman was a writer and publisher in the early 1900s who ran a tight publishing company . If a book didn’t sell at least 10,000 copies a year, he’d send it to his “hospital,” where he would brainstorm new ideas for the right title until it performed well.

  • Original title: Gautier’s Fleece of Gold
  • Original title’s sales: 6,000 copies/year
  • Why the original name: French writing was the rave at the time.

Here are his documented change, results, and reasoning:

  • New title: The Quest for a Blonde Mistress
  • New title’s sales: 50,000/year
  • Why he believed the original title failed: The title doesn’t tell you what it's about.

You read that correctly. Haldeman’s publishing company sold over 44,000 additional units because they changed the name to something less broad and more to the point. People ate it up.

In the following example, you'll see that significant changes aren’t always necessary. Sometimes just a simple tweak is all you need:

  • Original title: Mystery of the Iron Mask
  • Original title’s sales: 11,000/year
  • Why the original name: It was mysterious and to the point.

His changes:

  • New title: The Mystery of the Man in the Iron Mask
  • New title’s sales: 30,000/year
  • Why he believed the new title worked: A man wearing an iron mask is an intrinsically more intriguing mystery than just some iron mask.

(I would argue extra alliteration also piques readers’ interest.)

His list of book title changes and their dramatic increases in sales goes on and on. These examples serve as empirical proof that book titles make a difference in your marketing and sales.

Even modern-day authors like Joanna Penn have discovered this .

Let's face it, writing a book is super expensive. Best to make sure when you publish, you do everything you can to make it sell, including re-titling it.

Before we get into the step-by-step process of how to write a book title, let’s talk about the crucial elements that should go into book title selection.

What makes a good title for a book? Here are 4 crucial elements that make a good title for a book:

  • Intrigue factor
  • Title discoverability
  • Genre pairing
  • Relevance & specificity

Based on your situation, fan base, marketing tactic, and type of book, you may find that one particular element deserves priority over the others. I recommend using all 4 ingredients, but you may find the perfect title that only uses one.

You need to make sure your book title stands out for the right reasons. These 4 vital parts of a book title are proven to increase sales and draw in the right readers.

Intrigue Factor

Nothing draws a reader in more than creating intrigue with your title . The intrigue factor plays upon one’s curiosity and is a powerful motivator for readers to hit the “buy” button.

WARNING: On the path to creating intrigue, it’s easy to stray from the genre or get too broad, causing confusion. Watch out for this mistake!

3 examples of using the intrigue factor in book titles:

  • Pride, Prejudice, and Zombies: I bet you weren’t expecting that last part.
  • Trust Me I’m Lying: Anything contrarian catches a reader’s eye.
  • John Dies at the End: This great title makes you wonder why they just gave away the ending.

Title Discoverability

Bestselling authors have the luxury of not worrying about whether their titles are discoverable because their name recognition and author brand sell books.

The rest of us need to consider title discoverability.

That’s where Kindle keyword generation and research can come into play. If you want your book to show up on Amazon every time someone types in “How to train your border collie,” you should consider making that your book’s title.

If you'd like to see which words you can use in your title to improve the chance of discovery, you should definitely use Publisher Rocket . (Check out my full review of Publisher Rocket .)

Here’s a good book title that is very discoverable: How to Write a Children’s Book by Katie Davis. Straight and to the point, this book clearly tells both the buyer and Amazon precisely what this book is about.

(Check out Kindlepreneur’s free article on How To Write A Children's Book .)

Test it out. Go to Amazon and type: “How to Write a Children’s Book.” That’s discoverability!

Genre Pairing

Your title should match your genre. There are plenty of helpful tropes for fantasy titles, young adult titles, horror titles, mystery titles, non-fiction titles, etc. These tropes are not bad. Genre pairing helps the right kind of reader find your book.

A romance book should not be called Warborn: Battle for Arrakis . The cover may show images of love and passion, but the title screams, “epic science fiction military book.” In your effort to be different, try not to alienate your genre and potential readers.

3 examples of genre pairing in book titles:

  • Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: It’s evident that this is science-fiction, but it also tells us it's about robotics and that it will be a deep thinker. (This is the book that the Blade Runner movie was inspired by.)
  • Neverwhere: I love Neil Gaiman’s mystic cryptic fantasy. With just one compound word, Gaiman perfectly captured his genre.
  • Slasher Girls & Monster Boys: It immediately harkens to the thriller and horror genre without question. It even emphasizes the YA punch with the terms “Boy” and “Girl.”

Increase Your Book Marketing

See the Publisher Rocket effect, when you use the right keywords and categories to help get your book seen more on Amazon.

Relevance & Specificity

The title might be the only thing a potential buyer ever sees, so your title needs to convey what your book is actually about. The book title needs to be relevant and specific .

(I lumped in “relevance” with “specificity” because to be specific is to increase your relevance. The more specific your title is, the more relevant it is to your story, and the better a reader understands what your book is about.)

For non-fiction , you must title your book in such a way that a reader knows exactly what they’re buying. Often, non-fiction books will feature a simple, eye-catching title with a longer, more informative subtitle .

For fiction, relevance is still super important. Don’t mention dragons if there aren’t any dragons in your book. Don’t mention sexual themes if there are no sexual themes. Don’t mention corporate America if it doesn’t feature in the book. (Definitely do mention these if they show up in the book.)

Ensure your title helps the reader know what the book is about or what to expect from the get-go. That way, you draw in the right kind of reader instead of setting up the wrong reader for disappointment, leading to negative book reviews.

3 examples of relevant titles:

  • The Devil Wears Prada: Easy to see that this involves fashion and someone who is a complete pain in the butt from someone’s point of view . And I got all of that from 4 words!
  • I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell : Pretty easy to know immediately that this book is centered around the crazy antics of a jerk — no offense to Tucker Max, because he's a heck of a writer.
  • How to Lose Friends & Alienate People : This gets a nod for the intrigue factor because it’s using the familiarity of a famous book. However, it’s clear this is a book about… well, losing.

As far as specificity goes, a title tends to be more intriguing (and more relevant) if it offers specific details. Here are 4 examples of specific titles:

  • Moby Dick is more specific (and therefore better) than The Whale .
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is better than Down the River .
  • The Fellowship of the Ring is better than The Fellowship .
  • The Shining is better than The Hotel.

It's very important that these rules are followed, or your book may not be able to be published on Amazon.

Amazon has certain book title rules and requirements that authors must follow:

  • The title on your cover must match what you put into Amazon .
  • You can’t use claims of bestseller, rank, etc., in your title, even if it’s a bestselling book.
  • Don’t mention deals, discounts, or reduced prices — even if it isn’t a lie.
  • You can't reference other books or any other trademarks.
  • You can’t reference other authors or their pen names .
  • No irrelevant advertising is allowed.

Many books violate this and don't get dinged by Amazon. But if you intend on making a name for yourself, keep it above board — follow Amazon’s book title rules.

Choosing a book title is more than just creating a catchy phrase or memorable title.

Try this proven, step-by-step process for crafting a great book title:

  • Use parts of your story
  • Look up famous phrases
  • Consider a one-word title
  • Keep it simple
  • Obey your genre
  • Put a hook in your title
  • Use relevant keywords
  • Speak in benefits
  • Consult a book title generator
  • Add emotional trigger words
  • Check discoverability (including international)
  • Test your title for success
  • Add a subtitle

1. Use Parts of Your Story

For fiction, in particular, use parts of your story to come up with a relevant title that is both specific to your book and evocative to your target audience.

Look at these examples of book titles that use parts of their stories:

  • Character names: Harry Potter, Emma, Robinson Crusoe
  • Settings with embellishments: Murder on the Orient Express, Animal Farm
  • Dates/time/season: The Winds of Winter, 1984
  • Character motivation: Call of the Wild, How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days
  • Main event or showdown: The Last Battle, Red Rising
  • Central theme: Return of the King, Waiting for Godot
  • Important lines: Catcher in the Rye, To Kill a Mockingbird

2. Look Up Famous Phrases

Consider using familiarity as a way to catch a potential reader’s eye. Look up famous phrases and words from poetry, classical literature, or popular culture.

This strategy is best to do before you write the book. Looking up a famous phrase for your title may feel tacked on if you simply… tacked it on.

Here are 7 examples of book titles that use famous phrases:

  • Fault in our Stars
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls
  • Double Jeopardy
  • The War of Art
  • Till Death Do Us Part
  • Liberty or Death
  • A Song of Ice and Fire ( inspired by Robert Frost )

WARNING: Don’t use trademarked material, such as an author’s name or copyrighted work from the past 100 years or so.

3. Consider a One-Word Title

One-word titles are all the rage in today's fiction and non-fiction books. Consider a compelling one-word title for your book. I’m not recommending most of you should make your title only one word, but simply consider it.

Don't pick a random word. Select a powerful word that represents your book’s hook and themes and complements the strong imagery of your book cover.

One-word titles don’t necessarily need to refer to an event in the book, although they may. Sometimes, a robust emotional word, or even a word you make up, provides the power you need.

Examples of excellent one-word titles include:

  • Referential: Nevermore, Allegiant, Wicked, Frankenstein
  • Powerful and emotional: Endurance, Atonement, Euphoria
  • Made up words: Freakonomics, Essentialism, Brisingr
  • Iconic imagery: Twilight, Boneshaker, Ulysses, Lolita

WARNING : One-word titles can wreak havoc on your discoverability, particularly if they’re ubiquitous words or misspelled/made-up words. (Have you ever tried to look up Stephen King’s It ?) If you use a one-word title, make sure it is unique and easily searchable.

When it comes to search, many readers will add the word “book” to your title if it’s a single word. Before selecting your title, try searching for “Your Title” + “Book” to see what appears.

4. Keep It Simple

It’s a proven fact; people don’t like to feel awkward. Titles with inappropriate words or hard-to-say words can make readers feel uncomfortable.

Keep it simple. Don’t use overcomplicated words that people may have trouble saying (or spelling in a Google or Amazon search box).

Also, title length is important. Don’t make long titles that won’t fit on your book cover. Short titles aren’t just for short stories .

Pro tip: Imagine people saying your title out loud.

There are exceptions, of course. But those are the exceptions that prove the rule.

Long words, nonsense words, archaic words, and made-up words from your story have their place in titles, but make sure they are at least easy to say and spell. You want readers to be able to search for your book on Amazon or Google.

Intriguing, eye-catching, evocative titles can be simple. In fact, it’s easier to market a book that uses simple words to evoke powerful emotion.

5. Obey Your Genre

If you don't stick to the titling tropes of your genre, your readers won't know what to expect. This leads to unhappy readers and bad Amazon reviews.

You must obey your genre. Research your genre’s titling norms. Look at other books in your genre, topic, or niche. Analyze their title structure. Write down a list of genre-specific terms that sound right for your book.

If your book is a crossover genre, feel free to research all the genres that are combined in your book. To help your readers know what to expect, you should probably include terms and tropes in your title that apply to both genres, coupled with the powerful imagery of your book cover.

If you're still stuck, then this is where genre-specific title generators can come in quite handy.

6. Put a Hook in the Title

A good hook can get people to say, “I need this,” or, “What the heck? I better check this out!”

If done right, a hook in the title can stop the right readers dead in their tracks.

Turning genre tropes on their head tends to work.

You can also take a cliche title structure and turn it on its head, such as “The Art of [TOPIC].” This could sound cliche, but you could make it hook and surprise a reader with a twist: “The Art of Making Bad Art.” (I just made that up, but now I want to read it because it’s such a good hook.)

Hopefully, you wrote your book with an initial hook in mind — or at least a one-sentence synopsis to draw in readers. You should already have a hook for your story, so consider using it in your title.

5 examples of putting a hook in the title:

  • I Still Miss My Man, But My Aim is Getting Better
  • Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters
  • Death of a Salesman
  • In Search of Lost Time
  • A Season in Hell

7. Use Relevant Keywords

This one's my favorite. By doing your Kindle keyword research , you can find what terms people are searching for. Once you know this, you'll be able to use relevant keywords to boost your discoverability and marketability.

Example: Someone writing a resume might call it a “CV” or a “curriculum vitae,” especially outside the United States. Research may also reveal that people writing resumes are writing a cover letter as well.

A non-fiction author notices this and includes relevant keywords , increasing discoverability and sales. They could insert “resume” in the title and “CV” and “cover letter” in the subtitle.

Now that you have a short list of keywords people are actively searching for, use them in your title and subtitle to make sure your book ranks for those searches. That way, your book has a better chance of being discovered and bought.

If searching for Amazon keywords seems rough or time-consuming, you're going to love Publisher Rocket.

With Publisher Rocket , you can achieve the following:

  • Know how many people are searching for a phrase on Amazon
  • Gauge the competition for your book on that topic
  • Determine how much money others are making
  • See how much money a specific keyword makes on average
  • Ensure your book beats the competition and ranks at the top for that keyword

8. Speak in Benefits

Especially for non-fiction, it is often more compelling to speak in benefits the reader will receive rather than the problems you are solving.

In marketing speak, this is the argument of features vs. benefits. The features are what many companies (or authors) tend to focus on, but consumers tend to buy the product (book) they feel can offer the benefits they need.

As Krista Walsh of Honest eCommerce puts it : “Features tell customers what, and benefits tell customers why.”

Imagine you’re suffering from migraines. Which book would you prefer? Pain-Free Mind or 4 Ways to Treat Migraines ?

“Pain-Free Mind” makes you think of better days and more pleasant scenarios. “4 Ways to Treat Migraines” sounds like a dull pamphlet from your doctor’s office. Plus, using the word “migraine” may subconsciously remind the reader of their pain, which may sour them to your book.

In this example, Pain-Free Mind is likely the preferred title for most authors.

(Don't worry about it being too ambiguous; that's where the subtitle comes in. Pain-Free Mind: How to Completely Eradicate Painful Debilitating Migraines and Headaches .)

3 more examples of non-fiction book titles that speak in benefits:

  • How to Win Friends and Influence People — instead of “how to be a leader” or “why you don’t have friends”
  • Winning: The Ultimate Business How-To Book — instead of “how to be good a business person” or “why you aren’t winning”
  • How to Be a Real-Estate Millionaire — instead of “how to sell more real estate” or “you’re not as smart as I am”

9. Consult Book Title Generators

Book Title Generators use algorithms, Google, and Amazon information to create random titles that can inspire the perfect title. Did I mention that basically all of them are free ?

For a list of the best book title generators, check out my article on the Best Book Title Generators . In that article, I list the different book title generators and break them into categories and genres.

WARNING: When you consult book title generators, remember these are often generic story titles that reference random genre tropes. Some allow you to insert your own info, but most generators simply spit out general, randomized titles that are mainly meant to inspire you. Don’t take their suggestions as prescriptions.

10. Add Emotional Trigger Words

There are fundamental words that hold more weight in readers’ minds. We call these power words or emotional trigger words.

A few word changes can instantly evoke emotion in your potential buyer. These power words may elicit urgency, mysticism, intrigue, etc. They are proven marketing words that increase engagement and drive better conversions .

Switch out the weaker words in your title with the right emotional trigger words to drive a better mood or feeling.

Imagine telling someone that a book is good . Now imagine how much more weight your description would have if you said mind-blowing .

Here are a few other examples:

  • Big versus ginormous, monumental, or gigantic
  • Neat versus exciting, exhilarating , or jaw-dropping
  • Scary versus monstrous, repulsive , or unnatural
  • Get versus obtain, steal, earn, or pilfer
  • Beat versus slaughter, destroyed, or obliterated
  • Small versus tiny, miniscule, or bite-sized
  • Hit versus slam, strike, or pound
  • Soft versus tender, hushed, or muffled

In writing your book, not just writing the title for it, watch out for common modifiers that try to strengthen “weak” words. Very strong is a weaker way of saying powerful . These modifiers, like the word “very,” help spot your weakest words and rewrite them.

Bonus download: Check out my personal list of 400+ Power Words to help improve your book titles and give you superb ideas.

11. Check Discoverability (Including International)

Check your book title’s availability and discoverability by doing a simple Google and Amazon search for your potential title. If there are no matches, you’re golden.

However, if your title is exactly the same or very similar to another book’s (or movie or board game), you may want to go back to the drawing board.

In the US, there are no copyright laws on titles . For this reason, you will see a lot of books and movies with the same title, like these .

(Check out Kindlepreneur’s article on How to Copyright a Book in the US — Written by a Lawyer to cover yourself legally.)

Don’t compete with a more-popular book of the same title. Some scheming people might think this would be a great strategy to trick readers. But if someone downloads your book by mistake, be prepared to earn a scathing review.

Self-publishing authors should also check discoverability and marketability internationally .

When J.K. Rowling published Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in the UK, her marketing team realized that the US market wouldn’t be as receptive to the name . To Americans, the word “philosopher” didn’t have the same connotation as in the UK and was perceived as boring.

They changed the name for the US market to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone .

As it turns out, many movies, TV shows, and novels change their titles internationally. Check out some examples here .

You should also check for your book’s domain name availability .

I don’t recommend creating a website just for a book. If you are going to make a website, it should be for you as an author, and you can showcase all your books there. This is author branding versus book branding. Some disagree with me on this .

If you intend to create a website just for your book, make sure you can get your book title’s domain name. This will really help the discoverability and marketing of the book .

Alternatively, you might buy your book’s domain name and turn it into a redirect to your author website .

12. Test Your Title For Success

You should be brainstorming multiple title ideas. All authors need to test their new book titles among their target market to set themselves up for success. This includes side-by-side testing, Facebook groups, SurveyMonkey, and more.

Just ask Tim Ferriss.

In 2007, Ferriss finished a fantastic book, and he thought he had the perfect title: Broad Bands and White Sands . Thankfully, he didn’t just go with his first impression. He tested his possible titles and found his third option, The 4-Hour Workweek , resonated most with his target reader.

If Ferriss had gone with his personal favorite, he would have missed the success that he soon found. He spent maybe $200 on testing, but it likely earned him a 1,000x return on investment.

Ask the experts. Instead of asking family, friends, and coworkers who may not fall in your target audience (and who may just want to make you happy), show your working title to individuals with experience in all sides of book publishing, including:

  • Editors and proofreaders
  • Book store clerks
  • Other authors
  • Readers in your specific target audience

I say librarians and book store clerks because they see what people are reading and buying. They can tell you if your title (and cover) sounds (and looks) like something their customers would pick up.

Use PickFu to test your title for success. PickFu is a robust service that allows you to submit your different titles (or covers) to anonymous people who vote on which they prefer. It’s super easy to use and quick to set up. And it’s affordable when you use Kindlepreneur’s link to buy.

Steve Scott of Authority.pub credits PickFu for helping him choose the right book cover and ultimately helping his 10 Minute Declutter book become as successful as it is.

Use Facebook groups to test your title for success. Social media is a free and easy way to test your book title among potential readers.

Find a book group on Facebook and create a poll post. In the poll, list your potential titles and ask group members to vote on which they prefer. This is not a perfect system, but it’s free.

WARNING: One mistake many authors make with this is that they use just any old Facebook group. However, you need to ensure the group you use relates to your niche and contains potential buyers or professionals in your target market.

13. Check for Trademarks

While you can't legally trademark most titles, there are specific instances when someone can. That's why it is important to check your government's database of trademarks before choosing your title, just in case someone has trademarked it. Here are the links for the US, UK, and Canada:

  • US Trademark Search
  • UK Trademark Search
  • Canada Trademark Search

But isn't it illegal to trademark titles? Yes…except when you can.

A trademark applies to branding, which is why you can trademark a series name instead of an individual title. That series name is an example of a brand.

But it gets tricky when you have a Title, or Title elements that are also part of a brand. For example, “Catcher in the Rye” is trademarked, because it is part of a larger brand beyond just the book title.

Many authors might remember #CockyGate , where one author tried to trademark the word “Cocky” in relation to books. That one ultimately didn't hold up legally, but you can see how this could be a problem.

The Bottom Line: Make sure your book title is not already violating a trademark before you use it.

14. Add a Subtitle

Regarding non-fiction, you absolutely should use a subtitle to help your book's sales conversions and discoverability.

For fiction, you may or may not use a subtitle. Your book cover and title should effectively tell potential readers exactly your book’s genre and target audience, without the need for a subtitle.

Some fiction authors put “a novel” or “a young adult novel” as a small subtitle to clarify any potential confusion.

Of course, book series often use the series title as the main title and the individual book title as the subtitle.

Ask yourself, if you gave your fiction book cover to a total stranger and asked them what genre it was, would they get it right? If yes, then you're good — no subtitle needed. If no, you might want to use your subtitle to clarify the matter.

To understand how to effectively create a book subtitle, be sure to check out my full article here .

Real life examples and why they're good, bad or just plain ugly.

Check out my video on the best book titles. Plus, at the end, we have a little fun covering some of the more horrendous, terrible, and absolutely ridiculous book titles out there.

Want more videos like this? Then SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel.

There are a lot of great resources out there that can help you with this process. During my years of research on the topic, here are some that I would recommend you check out so as to build a stronger title selection.

  • 100+ Blog Title Templates That Grab Attention : Sure it’s for blog titles, but you’ll find out that this list of titles can really stimulate some creativity.
  • Michael Hyatt Four Favorite Strategies for Creating Titles : From the master himself, he has a couple of ideas that are pretty unique.
  • Tools to Help You Title Your Book : This is a guest post that I did for Write to Done that uses some blog title generators to help stimulate a title idea.
  • A-B-C-D Formula for Irresistible Nonfiction Book Titles : a guest post by one of my favorite self-publishing authorities, Derek Doepker. He lays out the goods on nonfiction specifically.
  • How To Write An Unforgettable Book Title That Screams “Buy Me! : my friend Steve Scott shares the 10 steps he uses to create profitable book titles (he’s sold over 1 million copies)

Podcast Episode – When and How to Title a Book

What to watch out for.

When you're creating your title, there are a few things that can easily cause it to sink at the marketplace. So to avoid poor sales resulting from your title, here are a few additional things to avoid:

  • Complex Language: A title is not the place to write your thesis statement or explain everything that is going on. You want your title to be clear and concise, otherwise you might frighten potential readers away.
  • One-word Titles (sometimes): This one comes with a caveat. Generally, one-word titles are unclear and harder to rank for on Amazon. This is especially true of non-fiction, but you can rely on a subtitle to include your primary keywords if your title is shorter. Fiction is a little bit different, where one-word titles are often much more common, and even encouraged in some cases. For fiction, it's best to see if other books in your genre are doing the same thing.
  • Misleading or Confusing Language: You'll want to make sure that your title clearly illustrates exactly what it is about. Bear in mind that you could be using a word or phrase that means different things to different people. Make sure to screen your book title for references that might be considered offensive or have a double meaning.

Thankfully, if you follow the steps above, you should have no problem creating an amazing title for your book.

What’s your title going to be?

Let me know if you composed the perfect title using this step-by-step guide.

After all, it’s how I title my books. It’s how The New York Times bestselling authors title their books. It’s how self-published authors should title their books.

Fun example: Although this book cover typography could use some work, I consider this book title a success because it catches my attention and makes sure that when I double-take, I see that it is actually about quilting:

Hey, you go, girl!

As you can see, crafting a perfect book title is not an exact science. Follow my 13 steps, and you’ll come up with an interesting, relevant, marketable title. It needs to convey the point of the book, not alienate the genre, be discoverable, and convert customers into buyers.

Dave Chesson

Related posts, cyber monday deals for writers 2023, how to write a nonfiction book in 2024: the ultimate guide for authors, launching a book: the ultimate step by step guide, sell more books on amazon, amazon kindle rankings e-book.

Learn how to rank your Kindle book #1 on Amazon with our collection of time-tested tips and tricks.

32 thoughts on “ How to Title a Book: 13 Steps to Choosing a Title That Sells ”

Excellent post Dave. And so rich with additional links out to other articles thanks Vicki

Cool post Dave.

Many people miss the 1900s book title experiment and believe that ebook titles are a “new thing” or just something that you throw together that makes it sound nice. Another way to test a title is to ssend people through Adwords and see which title they click on. it can be expensive in the long run, but a couple of hundred dollars can make a world of difference (search for Google $100 coupon for free Adwords cash). It will also gain a really good understanding of what exact searchers are looking for. Kind regards Jasonera

Very true. That’s how The 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss got his title. It was going to be something like White Sands and Broad Bands until Ads told him otherwise.

Comments are closed.

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  • Idea Generators

Book Title Generator: 1,000+ Book Title Ideas

Looking for the perfect book title? Our brilliant Book Title Generator has over 1,000 creative ideas to spark your imagination. From fun and quirky to mysterious and poetic, this handy tool makes coming up with a catchy title for your masterpiece easy. Keep reading for loads of title inspiration!

  • Book Title Generator

Sometimes the inspiration you need is in a book title. If you’re struggling to come up with a solid story idea , then this book title generator is for you! With over 1,000 unique book title ideas, you’re sure to find the inspiration you need for your next story. Feel free to edit and re-adjust these book titles to suit your own story.

Keep on reading this post for tips on creating your own book title and our free book title generator printable. You might also like our daily book title challenge , where you are given a new book title each day to write about.

Other Book Title Generators

Download our app, online book title generator, tips for creating a good book title, create your own book title, random book titles ideas, how do i come up with a title for my book, can you publish a book with no title, can i use any title for my book.

christmas-book-titles

View over 10,000 book title ideas offline, with our brand new Ideas Wizard App . Everything from romance, fantasy and even sci-fi book title ideas. Available now on the Google Play Store:

book-title-ideas-app

Just a reminder, our book title generator has been created to give you ideas for potential stories to write. You may need to adjust these titles so that they suit your story. If you’re looking for more book title ideas, please see our free story title generator which is built inside our story creator with thousands of book title ideas to discover:

story title generator imagine forest

For more book title ideas, check out our festive Christmas book title generator – The perfect inspiration for your Christmas stories. And if you’re writing a fantasy novel, then you should check out this fantasy book title generator for some magical book title ideas.

What makes a good book title? A good book title summarises your story without giving too much away. It is enticing, exciting and mysterious. Here are some tips for creating an awesome book title for your story:

  • Think about the genre: If you’re writing a horror book , then you’ll need a scary or dark book title to suit your story. If you’re writing a children’s story , make sure you think about words that your target readers will understand. Keep your genre in mind when coming up with book titles. And keep your audience in mind! 
  • Make a list of descriptive words: What is your story about? Who is the main character? What objects are used throughout? Where is your story set? These are all things you might want to think about when making a list of words that describe your story. This list will come in handy when writing your own book title.
  • Leave the book title until the end: It is easier to come up with a good book title when your story is written. The more familiar you are with your story, the easier it is to summarise it in a few words. 
  • Review your book title: If you have written your book title before writing the story, then reviewing it at the end is important. You might want to double-check if your book title is still relevant and if it can be further improved. A common theme we’ve seen with writers is that they normally start with a nice, romantic tale, which slowly turns dark and twisted. In which case, the title they gave at the beginning may no longer be relevant after their story is written.
  • Don’t overcomplicate it: Avoid making your book title too long or wordy, as this can put potential readers off. Keep it as simple as possible, preferably under five words or even less. When it comes to book titles the shorter, the better – Try to keep the mystery of your book hidden until your readers read it. Similarly, you should try to avoid complicated or technical words in your story. Even if your story is about physics or time travel, try to give it a name that everyone can understand. 
  • Keep it relevant: Your book title must have some relevance to your storyline or plot. Don’t go completely off-topic, by giving your book a title that just sounds, ‘cool’, but has no meaning behind it. For instance, you wouldn’t want to read a story called Forbidden Dragons that has no references to dragons in the story at all – How disappointing would that be!

Book titles are hard. And sadly there is no secret formula for creating the perfect book title. However there is a useful exercise you can do to create your own book title (or at least an early draft of it). The easiest way to come up with a basic book title is to think of an adjective and a noun relevant to your story. 

Take for example you have a gothic story about a dragon. Following the adjective and noun technique, you might come up with the following potential book title ideas:

  • The Dark Dragon
  • The Grim Dragon
  • The Gothic Dragon
  • The Blood Dragon
  • Bone Dragon

As you can see the above example book titles start with an adjective and then are followed by a noun. Including ‘The’ at the beginning is entirely optional. Using this basic technique you should be able to come up with hundreds of potential book titles for your story. 

It may not be a perfect technique for creating your own book title, but it’s a great start. More importantly, it’s a marvellous way to get your brain thinking and to get those creative juices flowing. And you never know, using this technique you’ll be able to come up with the best story title ever! So go on…Give it a go! 

Using this technique we have created a printable book title generator. Here you can use the first letter of your first name and surname to generate a random book title for your next story:

book titles e

To get you started here is a list of over 160 book titles to inspire you:

  • The Magic Tree
  • Winter Fairy
  • Wizards of Ice
  • Call of the Forest
  • The Enchanted Ones
  • A Spell Too Far
  • A Potion For The Wise
  • Tower To The Stars
  • Me, Moonie and Magic
  • The Last Flame
  • Lost Warriors Of Elysium
  • Night Light
  • Eye of the Wolf
  • The Hollow Spirit
  • Love of Tomorrow
  • Never Again
  • Eternal Soul
  • When Love Lasts
  • Nothing In This World
  • Tales of the Heart
  • Stolen Love
  • Yes, Maybe, No
  • Together For A Day
  • Burning Poem
  • Whispers of a Ghost
  • Dead Man’s WIsh
  • Skeletons in the House
  • The Lost Soul
  • A Party For Ghouls
  • Monster Strike
  • See Zombie and Run
  • Don’t Go There
  • Signs of the Past
  • The Monster In The Dark
  • Horror Stories In The Dark
  • Soulless Dead
  • Lonesome Shadow
  • Space Galaxy Adventure
  • Into The Stars
  • The Happy Alien
  • Aliens of a New Kind
  • Earth To Unknown
  • Dark New World
  • The One After Mars
  • Martian Boy
  • Signs of Life on Jupiter
  • Dangerous Moon
  • Bizarre Robot
  • Imaginary Gravity
  • Mysterious Cyborg
  • Stay Hidden
  • What’s Over There?
  • Clues And More Clues
  • Never to be Solved
  • The Mystery of Mr Watkins
  • Who Took My Book?
  • Who Stole My Homework?
  • The Meaning of Z
  • The Secrets Of Mr. Miller
  • Who Is Mary Walker?
  • The Crimes of Martin
  • The Lost Portrait
  • Blank Paper
  • Behind the Door
  • Who Were They?
  • Bad Surprise
  • The Cover Up
  • The Perfect Thief
  • The Secret Witness
  • Season For Revenge
  • Innocent Eyes
  • Long Road To Go
  • One Boy And The World
  • Neverending Trip
  • Point A to Z
  • The Search For Bella
  • Travelling To New Lands
  • One Car And The Road
  • Captain’s Lost Treasure
  • Unsolved Crimes
  • Who Stole My Cat?
  • The Judgement
  • Judge of Crime
  • Detective Collins and the Van
  • Nice Try John
  • Get Away And Run Away
  • A Sharp Punishment
  • Unofficial Crimes
  • The New Kind
  • Fear Of Those
  • We Are Powerful
  • Elite of the Unknowns
  • We Still Exist
  • The New Days
  • One Way Ride
  • Bang, Crash and Boom
  • A Boring Day
  • Action Pack Man
  • The Bad Guy
  • A Cowboy’s Story
  • Lone Cowboy
  • Riders Of The West
  • Cowboys In A Storm
  • Horse With No Rider
  • Yee-haw! Let’s Get Em!
  • Cattles And Horses
  • Quest Of The West
  • The Two-Cent Men
  • Burning The Breeze
  • Ridin’ To Roscoe
  • The Prince of Darkness
  • Cursed Queen
  • Warrior Princess
  • Slay Like a Princess
  • The Blue Knight
  • Arealia, Forest Princess
  • Iceman: The Melt Down
  • The Power Seekers
  • Fire And Water
  • The Amazing Adventures of Ice Boy
  • Homeless Heroes
  • Mutant Academy
  • Unique And Powerful
  • Cupcake Kitty
  • Christmas Turtle
  • The Angel And The Star
  • Snow This Christmas
  • A Turkey For Christmas
  • Changing Times
  • Never The Same
  • Back In TIme
  • World of Tomorrow
  • World of Yesterday
  • Yesterday is Today
  • Before The Past
  • Standing Still
  • An Elephant’s Journey
  • Cats, Dogs And Other Pets
  • The Other Animals
  • Swimming With Sharks
  • My Best Friend The Lion
  • Snail’s Speedy Adventures
  • Once Upon A Rat
  • Rain On Those
  • Miss Minnie And The Bees
  • Galaxy Bugs
  • Invaders of the Earth
  • Trapped Like A Bug
  • One Mole And A Cat
  • Secrets Of Mara
  • The Unwanted Toy
  • My Neighbour The Alien
  • One Spell Away
  • Caveman in the City
  • Dragon Invasion
  • Talking Trees
  • Ninja Cats Rescue Mission
  • The Strange Key
  • Message in a Bottle
  • Whispers in the Wind
  • Beyond the Horizon
  • Chronicles of Celestia
  • Shadow Dance
  • The Forgotten Kingdom
  • Cogs of Time
  • Starlight Serenade
  • Veil of Illusions
  • The Sapphire Crown
  • Phoenix Reborn
  • Secrets of the Silver Forest
  • Echoes of Eternity
  • Midnight Mirage
  • Song of the Sirens
  • Celestial Dreamscape
  • Shattered Realms
  • The Astral Alchemist
  • Serpent’s Embrace
  • Quantum Quill
  • Twilight Reverie
  • Oracle’s Overture
  • Whirlwind of Wonders
  • Beyond the Veil
  • Enigma of the Ember Stone
  • Aurora’s Embrace
  • Nexus of Nebulae
  • Stormweaver’s Saga
  • Labyrinth of Legends
  • Whispers of the Waning Moon
  • Chronicles of the Crystal Citadel
  • Quantum Quasar
  • Ember’s Lullaby
  • The Velvet Veil
  • Enchanted Odyssey
  • Moonlit Mosaic
  • Scepter of Shadows
  • Astral Symphony
  • The Chronicles of Evermore
  • Echoes of Eldoria
  • Sapphire Serenity
  • The Stargazer’s Sonnet
  • Whims of the Whispering Willow
  • Enigma’s End
  • Celestial Sonnet
  • Oracle’s Odyssey
  • Cogs and Chronicles
  • Symphony of Shadows
  • Echoes in the Silence
  • Threads of Destiny
  • Silent Reverie
  • Whispers of Yesterday
  • The Art of Letting Go
  • Shadows of Reflection
  • Kaleidoscope of Memories
  • Uncharted Waters
  • Mosaic of Moments
  • Fragments of Time
  • The Color of Tomorrow
  • In the Blink of an Eye
  • Footprints in the Sand
  • A Symphony of Souls
  • The Language of Rain
  • Dancing with Shadows
  • Serendipity’s Song
  • The Road Less Traveled
  • Wandering Hearts
  • Windows to the Soul
  • Notes from Nowhere
  • Reflections in Blue
  • The Art of Beginning Again
  • Whispers of Wisdom
  • The Silent Symphony
  • Tangled Threads
  • The Canvas of Life
  • Pages of Possibility
  • Trailblazers and Tribulations
  • Ripple Effect
  • The Unseen Canvas
  • Echoes of Tomorrow
  • Silent Sparks
  • The Tapestry of Time
  • The Alchemy of Change
  • Veins of Vulnerability
  • Footprints of Fate
  • The Palette of Promise
  • Shattered Illusions
  • The Stillness Within
  • Untold Stories
  • The Journey Home
  • Melodies of the Mind
  • Hidden Harmony
  • Echoes of Euphoria
  • Shadows in the Attic
  • The Patchwork Path
  • The Language of Light
  • Whispers of Wonder
  • A Symphony of Silence
  • Echoes of Myra
  • Beyond the Surface
  • The Quiet Revolution
  • Serendipity’s Edge
  • The Canvas of Tomorrow
  • Footprints Across Time
  • The Art of Balance
  • Shadows in the Mirror
  • Mosaic Moments
  • The Color of Rain
  • Songs of Serenity
  • Kaleidoscope of Reflection
  • Windows to Yesterday
  • Echoes of Evolution
  • The Ripple Effect
  • The Dance of Shadows
  • The Road Not Taken
  • Pages of Serendipity
  • The Unseen Symphony
  • The Echo Chamber
  • A Palette of Promises
  • Shadows of Tomorrow
  • Fragments of Fate
  • Whispers in the Attic
  • Trails of Transformation
  • My Mind’s Mystery

Can you create your own book title using the adjective and noun technique or from the ideas in our book title generator? Share your book titles with us in the comments below.

Coming up with the perfect title for your book can be tricky! A good title should be catchy, descriptive and make readers want to pick up your book. When brainstorming ideas, think about your target audience, genre and the main themes or topics of your story.

Using the book title generator can give you a huge list of creative options to get your imagination going. Pick words and phrases that sum up the essence of your book or capture something intriguing about the plot or characters. You can combine interesting adjectives with nouns related to the setting or conflict.

Also consider literary or poetic devices like alliteration, rhyme, repetition and wordplay. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different possibilities until you find the ideal title that captures the spirit of your writing. The most important thing is to choose something memorable that will appeal to readers browsing bookshelves or online listings.

See our guide on how to come up with a good book title .

While it may seem tempting for a book to have no title and let the writing speak for itself, publishers will require books to have a title before being published. Some key reasons for this include:

  • Titles are crucial for marketing and helping readers quickly identify what a book is about. Without a title, it’s very difficult to promote or sell a book effectively.
  • Titles give structure and context when a book is added to a catalogue or bookshelf. They allow books to be organized and categorized.
  • Many online book retailers require a title field when submitting book information. Title-less books would likely get rejected.
  • Readers browse books by title all the time. No title means no way for potential readers to easily reference the book.
  • Titles provide convenient shorthand to refer to a book in conversation or reviews.

So while a purely content-focused book with no title may sound avant-garde, it’s highly impractical from a publishing and marketing perspective. The title plays a critical role in a book’s discoverability and commercial viability. That’s why publishers require even the most experimental literary works to have a title before hitting the shelves.

When choosing a title for your book, you do have a lot of creative freedom, but you can’t use just any title you want. Here are some important considerations around book titles:

  • You can’t use a title that is already in use by another book. Titles need to be unique to avoid copyright issues. Doing a quick search on Amazon or Google Books can help check if your desired title is taken.
  • Be cautious about using titles with branded names or trademarks. You may need permission to use words like Band-Aid, Kleenex etc.
  • Don’t use misleading titles that have nothing to do with the book’s subject matter, as readers will feel deceived.
  • Check if the title is search-friendly. Extremely vague, odd or cryptic titles can get buried in search results.
  • Be sensitive with provocative or offensive titles that may turn off readers or distributors.
  • Steer clear of book titles with clickbait-y wording, as readers dislike misleading hype.

While the book title space is vast, do your research to ensure your chosen title is distinct, accurate, marketable and in line with industry norms and reader expectations. The right title can excite readers and set your book up for success.

Our Book Title Generator provides an endless supply of creative and unique book titles to spark your imagination. Let us know in the comments if you found the perfect title for your story among our suggestions.

What’s your favourite title idea from our generator? We’d love to hear how this tool helped you in your writing journey. Keep using it to brainstorm titles until you discover that ideal attention-grabbing name for your masterpiece!

book title generator- random book title ideas

Marty the wizard is the master of Imagine Forest. When he's not reading a ton of books or writing some of his own tales, he loves to be surrounded by the magical creatures that live in Imagine Forest. While living in his tree house he has devoted his time to helping children around the world with their writing skills and creativity.

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Book Title Generator

Explore endless possibilities for your book's title. Enter your ideas and let AI craft a title that captures the essence of your story.

Below are 0 curated book titles based on your input

Welcome to our title generation platform. Here, you can find the right title for your book with ease. Whether you're an experienced writer or just starting out, the importance of a compelling title is clear. It's more than just a name; it's a first impression and a preview of what readers can expect. Our tool combines creativity with technology to help you find a title that truly reflects the essence of your work.

Our platform uses advanced neural networks to generate book titles. This technology examines successful titles across various genres to provide suggestions that are unique and relevant to your book's content and theme. It's designed to support a wide range of works, from fiction and non-fiction to personal memoirs, by understanding and adapting to the core of your narrative.

Our service is user-friendly. You have the option to enter a potential title, a summary of your book, or even the full text (up to 100,000 characters). The system will then suggest titles that match your book's narrative and style. These suggestions are meant to inspire you and help you find the perfect title for your manuscript. Feel free to experiment with different inputs to explore a wide range of creative title options.

Finding the right title is crucial, and our platform is here to assist you in this important step. It's an opportunity to discover a title that fits your story perfectly. We encourage you to try it and see how technology can complement your creativity in the search for a title that stands out. Your ideal title is just a few clicks away, ready to give your book the introduction it deserves.

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How To Write Book Titles The Proper Way: A Complete Guide For Writers

  • February 10, 2022

Book titles within essays or papers can be tricky. There are specific rules that are given for how to include a book title in a way that sets it apart from the content of your writing given by the Modern Language Association. However, as with many other things in life, there are exceptions to the rules. This article will guide you through the rules of the writing style guides so that you can include a book’s title in your paper or essay correctly.

How to write book titles:

Style guides and book titles.

When it comes to book titles within text, there are a few different style guides that have rules you can follow, depending on your writing type. The three types that you will encounter most often are; MLA style, Chicago manual of style, and APA. A writing instructor will usually tell you what style guide you are expected to use for a particular essay or paper.

MLA Style Guide

The MLA handbook states that you should always italicize book titles when styling book titles within your text. The exception to this rule are religious texts. You would not italicize the Holy Bible or the sacred books or titles of other religions. Note the following example.

Pam had stayed most of the summer indoors, re-reading her favorite book series. She was already up to  Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone , and she didn’t regret not being more active or going outside.

In the above example, the book title is italicized. Fiction titles and nonfiction titles alike must be in italics when within the text.

Series Titles in MLA

In the above example, a book from a series was used. But what if the text had not specified which book from the series Pam was reading? Would it still need to be in italics? The answer is: in this case, yes. In other cases, sometimes.

It’s really not as confusing as it seems. When you are talking about a book series but don’t want or need to include the complete series titles for the purposes of your work, you only have to put words in italics that also appear in the book titles. So, because  Harry Potter  is part of the title of all of the books in the series, you would italicize his name every time you mention the book.

However, if you were talking about Katniss Everdeen, you would not have to do this, as the book series she is featured in doesn’t use her name in the titles of  The Hunger Games  series. The same would be true of books like the Nancy Drew books.

Quotation Marks

There are instances in which titles should be placed inside of quotation marks within a paper or essay. This is done when you cite the titles of poems , a chapter title, short stories, articles, or blogs.

How To Write Book Titles

So, for example, if you were to write a paper that featured a poem from a book, you would put the book title in italics and the poems cited in quotation marks.

An example of an enduring love poem is “Annabel Lee” from  The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe. 

Chapter Title

Another time that quotation marks should be used is when using the title of a chapter. If you are citing a specific chapter of a book, you would enclose the title of the chapter in quotation marks, and the title of the book should be in italics.

The desperation and sadness of a man on death row can be seen in the “Wild Wind Blowing” chapter of Norman Mailer’s  The Executioner’s Song. 

Short Stories

Short stories are another case. Much like the title of a chapter or poem, in which the title is placed in quotation marks, while the title of the book or collection it is found in is italics. The same can be said for sections, stories, or chapters cited within a literary journal.

Stepping away from his norm of horror and gore, Stephen King writes of trust, love, and regret in his story “The Last Rung on the Ladder,” which can be found in his short story collection  Night Shift. 

Punctuation Marks

If you are citing a story or title that includes question marks, you need to make sure to italicize the question mark when citing. Keep all punctuation, such as a question mark, comma, ellipses, colon, or exclamation mark, as it is in the original individual books.

If you want a funny and irreverent read, you’ve got to try  Are You There, Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea.  Chelsea Handler has done a phenomenal job of being vulgar, relatable, and explaining life from her viewpoint in this hilarious and memorable book.

The Digital Age: Are Book Titles Underlined Anymore?

MLA style used to dictate that a book title should either be in italics or underlined. However, that is no longer the case. As computers started to take over as the major tool used in writing, it became unpopular to underline book titles. Therefore, this rule was dropped from the style guides.

However, it should be mentioned that when handwriting an essay or research paper, many instructors prefer that you underline book titles, as it’s relatively difficult to handwrite italics. If you are in a writing course or a class that is heavy on handwritten work, be sure to ask your instructor or teacher which method they prefer for citing a book title.

How To Write Book Titles

How to Come Up with Book Title Ideas

Now that quotation marks, italics, and style guides have been discussed, let’s move on to how you can come up with your own book title. If you’d like a title for your book that sounds interesting and will get a reader’s attention, you may find this article helpful.

Coming up with a good title for your book is a challenging yet essential marketing decision . The right title can make your target audience choose your new book off of the shelf instead of another writer’s work. Your book cover and your book title are quite possibly the most important marketing decisions you will make.

How to Choose a Good Book Title

Certain criteria should be met if you want to have a good book title , and there are specific steps involved in getting there. You may have assumed up until now that titles of books were just spur of the moment decisions made by authors or publishers, but a lot of work goes into writing good titles.

Grab the Reader’s Attention

As a general rule, you want your reader to remember your title and to sound interesting, even without the reader having seen the cover. There are several ways to do this. You can be a little dark with your title, be controversial, provoke the reader, or even be funny.

There are many examples of such works that use memorable and attention-seeking titles. The following are some different titles that are effective and would most likely provoke a reader to grab them from a shelf for closer inspection.

  • Burn After Writing (Sharon Jones)
  • Love in the Time of Cholera (Gabriel Garcia Marquez)
  • Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (Mindy Kaling)
  • Are You There, Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea (Chelsea Handler)
  • The Devil Wears Prada (Lauren Weisberger)
  • Chicken Soup for the Soul (various authors)
  • God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian (Kurt Vonnegut)

Shorter Titles

If your full title for your book is long, you may end up boring a reader or creating a situation where a reader tries to remember the title of your book, but it’s too long and ends up getting it confused with another book. Although you should always do your best to make sure that there aren’t books by other authors that share a title or have a title similar to your book (more on that in a minute), you don’t want a person to get confused and get the wrong book instead.

Research Your Title Ideas

It’s a good idea to take the titles you have considered for your book and make a list. Then, do your homework. You can use tools like Google Adwords to test out your title to see if there are others like it, or you can simply use any search engine and plug your title ideas into the search bar and see what similar or exact titles of the same words pop up.

Readers are generally busy people. They don’t have the time or the energy to ensure that writers get a title right. They’ll look for the book they are interested in, and if it proves to be too difficult, or if there are other books written that have the same title, they’ll move on to something else.

A writer really has to make sure that they have a title that isn’t going to be ignored, is interesting, isn’t too long, and isn’t too similar to other works.

The same goes for titles of short works within a larger body of work. Short works, like poems or stories, need to have unique titles as well when included in a larger body of work, such as a collection. If stories are similar in nature, be sure to title them differently so that readers will be able to tell them apart, as well.

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Here Are The 2024 Summer Scares Titles For a Summer of Excellent Horror Reading

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Kelly Jensen

Kelly is a former librarian and a long-time blogger at STACKED. She's the editor/author of (DON'T) CALL ME CRAZY: 33 VOICES START THE CONVERSATION ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH and the editor/author of HERE WE ARE: FEMINISM FOR THE REAL WORLD. Her next book, BODY TALK, will publish in Fall 2020. Follow her on Instagram @heykellyjensen .

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summer scares logo 2024

This year, Summer Scares welcomes author Clay McLeod Chapman as the 2024 spokesperson. “Our bookshelves are getting haunted this summer!” exclaims Chapman. “Every last one of the books selected for this year’s Summer Scares is a beautiful little nightmare just waiting for the right reader to come along and crack it open. The outright honor of amassing this awesome roster of authors cannot be overstated. I love each and every last one of these books and I can’t wait to shout about how terrifying they are all summer long.”

Each year, three titles are selected in each of three categories: Adult, Young Adult, and Middle Grade. For 2024 the selected titles are:

collage of adult summer scares 2024 book covers

Adult Selections

  • Jackal by Erin E. Adams (Bantam, 2022)
  • Such Sharp Teeth by Rachel Harrison (Berkley, 2022)
  • This Thing Between Us by Gus Moreno (MCD x FSG Originals, 2021)

summer scares cover collage for ya book titles

Young Adult Selections

  • All These Bodies by Kendare Blake (Quill Tree Books, 2021)
  • Dead Flip by Sara Farizan (Algonquin Young Readers, 2022)
  • #MurderTrending by Gretchen McNeil (Freeform, 2018)

summer scares middle grade book cover collage

Middle Grade Selections

  • Ophie’s Ghosts by Justina Ireland (Balzer + Bray, 2021)
  • The Nest by Kenneth Oppel (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2015)
  • My Aunt Is A Monster by Reimena Yee (Random House Graphic, 2022)

The goal of Summer Scares is to introduce Horror titles to school and public library workers in order to help them start conversations with readers that will extend beyond the books from each list and promote reading for years to come. In addition to the annual list of recommended titles, the Summer Scares Programming Guide, created each year by the Springfield-Greene County (MO) Library — and free for libraries anywhere to access, is back with the tools libraries need to connect with their patrons.

“The 2024 guide is packed with ideas that library workers can use to engage their communities with these great titles, whether they’re putting up book displays, hosting author events, or planning an entire Summer Scares program series,” states Konrad Stump, co-creator of the programming guide. The guide will be available beginning March 1, 2024, on the Summer Scares Resource page at https://raforallhorror.blogspot.com/p/summer-scares.html

Along with the guide, the Summer Scares committee will work with both the recommended list authors and Horror authors from all over the country to provide free programming to libraries. Any library looking to host horror-themed events any time of year is encouraged to email [email protected] to get started.

2024 summer scares book cover collage

Once again, Summer Scares will be included as part of iRead, a summer reading program that is used by libraries in the United States and across the globe by the Department of Defense for libraries on military bases. “While there is nothing scary about Summer Reading, there is no better time than summer to scare up some great books. iREAD is thrilled (and chilled!) to partner once again with Summer Scares to introduce Horror titles to school and public library workers in order to help them start conversations with readers that perfectly align with our mission to bridge the summer gap while inspiring literacy and life-long learning,” shares iREAD Content and Development Manager Becca Boland. “We look forward to working with Summer Scares to help people find their voice — even if it is to scream!”

Booklist is helping to kick off Summer Scares 2024 in March with a series of three free webinars with this year’s featured authors in conversation with the committee members:

  • Monday, March 11, 2024, at 4 p.m. Eastern, featuring our Middle Grade authors and moderated by Sarah Hunter
  • Thursday, March 21, 2024, at 2 p.m. Eastern, featuring our Young Adult authors and moderated by Yaika Sabat
  • Monday, March 25, 2024, at 2 p.m. Eastern, featuring our Adult authors and moderated by Clay McLeod Chapman

Each webinar lasts one hour. Anyone may register to participate for free at https://www.booklistonline.com/webinars . Recordings will be available for on-demand viewing after the live events at https://www.booklistonline.com/webinars-archive .

All are welcome to join the Summer Scares committee and featured authors at the HWA’s Librarians’ Day, taking place in person on May 31, 2024, in San Diego as part of StokerConⓇ. Details at: https://www.stokercon2024.com .

The HWA is a non-profit organization of writers and publishing professionals and the oldest organization dedicated to the Horror/Dark Fiction genre. One of the HWA’s missions is to foster an appreciation of reading through extensive programming and partnerships with libraries, schools, and literacy-based organizations.

The 2024 Summer Scares program committee consists of author Clay McLeod Chapman, HWA Library Committee Co-Chairs Becky Spratford and Konrad Stump, as well as Academic Librarian Carolyn Ciesla, Book Riot Editor and YA specialist Kelly Jensen, Booklist Editor and Middle Grade specialist Julia Smith, and Manager of Reader Services at NoveList Yaika Sabat.

For more information about the Summer Scares reading program, including committee member bios and how to obtain promotional materials and schedule events with the authors/committee members, please visit The Summer Scares Resource Page ( https://raforallhorror.blogspot.com/p/summer-scares.html ) or email HWA Library Committee Co-Chairs Becky Spratford and Konrad Stump at [email protected].

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Can You Find the 10 International Thrillers Hidden in This Text Puzzle?

By J. D. Biersdorfer Feb. 20, 2024

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An illustration of a book cover/door opening and casting light on a small figure in front of it.

In the mood for some globe-hopping from a comfy chair? This month’s Title Search encourages you to discover 10 thrillers with settings around the world. The titles of the novels are hidden below within an unrelated text passage. As you read along, tap or click the words when you think you’ve found a title. Correct answers stay highlighted. When you uncover each title, the answer section at the bottom of the screen grows to create a reading list with more information and links to the books.

A new literary quiz lands on the Books page each week and you can match wits with previous puzzles in the Book Review Quiz Bowl archive .

“I just heard through a back channel that Solo slipped away from the Hydra Head bar,” said the deputy director.

The operations officer nodded. “The accident we staged outside with the trucks burned enough oil and attention to let her shake off the assassin from the cartel.”

“It was a close call,” admitted the deputy. “Give her that ski vacation before we start the counterfeit case.”

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Even in countries where homophobia is pervasive and same-sex relationships are illegal, queer African writers are pushing boundaries , finding an audience and winning awards.

In Lucy Sante’s new memoir, “I Heard Her Call My Name,” the author reflects on her life and embarking on a gender transition  in her late 60s.

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Each week, top authors and critics join the Book Review’s podcast to talk about the latest news in the literary world. Listen here .

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20 drinks mentioned in book titles

Posted: January 9, 2024 | Last updated: January 9, 2024

<p>Sometimes there’s nothing better than relaxing with a good book and a refreshing pitcher of lemonade, glass of wine, or cup of coffee. And bonus points if the book happens to have a drink right in the name! To complement <a href="https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/22_famous_book_titles_that_include_food/s1__38742270">our article about famous books that include food</a>, here are 20 drinks mentioned in book titles.</p>

Sometimes there’s nothing better than relaxing with a good book and a refreshing pitcher of lemonade, glass of wine, or cup of coffee. And bonus points if the book happens to have a drink right in the name! To complement our article about famous books that include food , here are 20 drinks mentioned in book titles.

<p>During the Second World War, a cargo ship runs aground on a Scottish island while carrying 50,000 cases of whisky. The locals rush to save the shipment of spirits, which they must then defend from the authorities. That’s the plot of Compton Mackenzie’s “Whisky Galore,” which is based on a true story, and is also the inspiration for both a 1949 British comedy movie and a play!</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/when_were_these_22_american_foods_invented_122723/s1__37735968'>When were these 22 American foods invented?</a></p>

Whisky Galore (1947)

During the Second World War, a cargo ship runs aground on a Scottish island while carrying 50,000 cases of whisky. The locals rush to save the shipment of spirits, which they must then defend from the authorities. That’s the plot of Compton Mackenzie’s “Whisky Galore,” which is based on a true story, and is also the inspiration for both a 1949 British comedy movie and a play!

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<p>Four years after Ray Bradbury published his most famous work, the dystopian novel “Fahrenheit 451,” the author released “Dandelion Wine.” A much simpler work that focused on the small-town lifestyle, much of “Dandelion Wine” was based on Bradbury’s own upbringing in the Chicago suburb of Waukegan, Illinois.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

Dandelion Wine (1957)

Four years after Ray Bradbury published his most famous work, the dystopian novel “Fahrenheit 451,” the author released “Dandelion Wine.” A much simpler work that focused on the small-town lifestyle, much of “Dandelion Wine” was based on Bradbury’s own upbringing in the Chicago suburb of Waukegan, Illinois.

Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.

<p>The “pop” in “Hop on Pop” actually refers to a father character, but it’s the closest thing to a drink in the title of any Dr. Seuss book! Plus, we love this classic collection of poems that aims to teach kids the basics of phonics and reading. You may refer to fizzy drinks by another name (soda or Coke), but did you know that roughly 25% of America uses the term “pop”?</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/the_20_best_european_beach_destinations_122623/s1__39607980'>The 20 best European beach destinations</a></p>

Hop on Pop (1963)

The “pop” in “Hop on Pop” actually refers to a father character, but it’s the closest thing to a drink in the title of any Dr. Seuss book! Plus, we love this classic collection of poems that aims to teach kids the basics of phonics and reading. You may refer to fizzy drinks by another name (soda or Coke), but did you know that roughly 25% of America uses the term “pop”?

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<p>“Sam, Bangs & Moonshine” has a title that sounds a bit adult-oriented, but it’s actually a children’s book written by Evaline Ness in 1966. The titular moonshine isn’t referring to high-proof homemade liquor, but instead a slang term for foolish fantasies or ideas. As for the rest of the title: Sam is the book’s protagonist and Bangs is her cat.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

Sam, Bangs & Moonshine (1966)

“Sam, Bangs & Moonshine” has a title that sounds a bit adult-oriented, but it’s actually a children’s book written by Evaline Ness in 1966. The titular moonshine isn’t referring to high-proof homemade liquor, but instead a slang term for foolish fantasies or ideas. As for the rest of the title: Sam is the book’s protagonist and Bangs is her cat.

<p>In 1967, flight attendants Trudy Baker and Rachel Jones penned the tell-all memoir “Coffee, Tea or Me?” Readers were tickled by this humorous recounting of the ups and downs (no pun intended) of working in the airline industry, and the book eventually spawned three sequels that sold millions of copies. The only problem? Trudy and Rachel weren’t real people, but instead fictitious authors created by an American Airlines public relations employee named Donald Bain.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/21_of_the_best_countries_for_coffee_lovers_to_visit_122623/s1__39674682'>21 of the best countries for coffee lovers to visit</a></p>

Coffee, Tea or Me? (1967)

In 1967, flight attendants Trudy Baker and Rachel Jones penned the tell-all memoir “Coffee, Tea or Me?” Readers were tickled by this humorous recounting of the ups and downs (no pun intended) of working in the airline industry, and the book eventually spawned three sequels that sold millions of copies. The only problem? Trudy and Rachel weren’t real people, but instead fictitious authors created by an American Airlines public relations employee named Donald Bain.

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<p>The devil went down to…the Soviet Union? That’s the plot of “The Master and Margarita,” a masterpiece written by Russian playwright Mikhail Bulgakov during Stalin’s reign in the 1930s. Due to its controversial anti-communist content, “The Master and Margarita” wasn’t published until 1967, posthumously, as Bulgakov died in 1940. The “Margarita” in the title does not refer to the drink, but instead the protagonist's name.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

The Master and Margarita (1967)

The devil went down to…the Soviet Union? That’s the plot of “The Master and Margarita,” a masterpiece written by Russian playwright Mikhail Bulgakov during Stalin’s reign in the 1930s. Due to its controversial anti-communist content, “The Master and Margarita” wasn’t published until 1967, posthumously, as Bulgakov died in 1940. The “Margarita” in the title does not refer to the drink, but instead the protagonist's name.

<p>For three weeks in the mid-1960s, author Tom Wolfe joined Ken Kesey as he and his crew of Merry Pranksters traversed America in a brightly colored school bus called Further. The resulting book, “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” was lauded as an accurate portrayal of the blossoming hippie movement and a pioneering example of the New Journalism style. The title refers to the parties the Pranksters would often throw or attend that included LSD-laced punch as an important element.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/20_essential_tips_for_leveling_up_your_skincare_game_010824/s1__36646364'>20 essential tips for leveling up your skincare game</a></p>

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968)

For three weeks in the mid-1960s, author Tom Wolfe joined Ken Kesey as he and his crew of Merry Pranksters traversed America in a brightly colored school bus called Further. The resulting book, “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” was lauded as an accurate portrayal of the blossoming hippie movement and a pioneering example of the New Journalism style. The title refers to the parties the Pranksters would often throw or attend that included LSD-laced punch as an important element.

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<p>Freckle juice isn’t a real thing. Instead, it’s the subject of a Judy Blume children’s book about a little boy who wants freckles and drinks a concoction suggested by a swindler schoolmate looking to make a quick buck. (Although it was actually 50 cents because the book came out in 1971…and they’re children.)</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

Freckle Juice (1971)

Freckle juice isn’t a real thing. Instead, it’s the subject of a Judy Blume children’s book about a little boy who wants freckles and drinks a concoction suggested by a swindler schoolmate looking to make a quick buck. (Although it was actually 50 cents because the book came out in 1971…and they’re children.)

<p>Not only did John Irving write the 1985 novel “The Cider House Rules,” but he also wrote the screenplay for the 1999 film version that starred Toby Maguire, Michael Caine, and Charlize Theron. In addition to being a box-office success, “The Cider House Rules” nabbed two Academy Awards, including a Best Adapted Screenplay win for Irving. </p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/20_timeless_decor_ideas_for_any_home_010824/s1__37551992'>20 timeless decor ideas for any home</a></p>

The Cider House Rules (1985)

Not only did John Irving write the 1985 novel “The Cider House Rules,” but he also wrote the screenplay for the 1999 film version that starred Toby Maguire, Michael Caine, and Charlize Theron. In addition to being a box-office success, “The Cider House Rules” nabbed two Academy Awards, including a Best Adapted Screenplay win for Irving. 

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<p>“The Face on the Milk Carton” was quite popular when it came out in the ‘90s — for both good and bad reasons. The young adult novel was an enthralling story of a little girl who sees her picture on the side of a milk carton and begins to question her upbringing and parents. (And yes, milk cartons were indeed where posters of missing children used to be displayed.) The book also contained mature themes, which got it banned by some schools. In addition to selling millions of copies, “The Face on the Milk Carton” was adapted as a made-for-TV movie in 1995.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

The Face on the Milk Carton (1990)

“The Face on the Milk Carton” was quite popular when it came out in the ‘90s — for both good and bad reasons. The young adult novel was an enthralling story of a little girl who sees her picture on the side of a milk carton and begins to question her upbringing and parents. (And yes, milk cartons were indeed where posters of missing children used to be displayed.) The book also contained mature themes, which got it banned by some schools. In addition to selling millions of copies, “The Face on the Milk Carton” was adapted as a made-for-TV movie in 1995.

<p>Elmore Leonard wrote numerous popular Western and crime novels, including “Hombre” (1960), “Get Shorty” (1990), “Rum Punch” (1992), and “Out of Sight” (1996). Even if Leonard isn’t on your reading radar, you may know these films because each one was made into a movie. While the film versions of “Hombre,” “Get Shorty,” and “Out of Sight” all used the book titles, “Rum Punch” was given another name when it was adapted by Quentin Tarantino: “Jackie Brown.”</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/20_purr_fect_gift_ideas_for_cat_lovers/s1__38269414'>20 purr-fect gift ideas for cat lovers</a></p>

Rum Punch (1992)

Elmore Leonard wrote numerous popular Western and crime novels, including “Hombre” (1960), “Get Shorty” (1990), “Rum Punch” (1992), and “Out of Sight” (1996). Even if Leonard isn’t on your reading radar, you may know these films because each one was made into a movie. While the film versions of “Hombre,” “Get Shorty,” and “Out of Sight” all used the book titles, “Rum Punch” was given another name when it was adapted by Quentin Tarantino: “Jackie Brown.”

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<p>Back-to-back Elmore Leonard books! Six years after publishing “Rum Punch,” Leonard released “Cuba Libre,” a crime caper about a cowboy seeking justice in Cuba during the onset of the Spanish-American war. “Cuba libre,” in case you’re not aware, is also another name for a rum and coke!</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

Cuba Libre (1998)

Back-to-back Elmore Leonard books! Six years after publishing “Rum Punch,” Leonard released “Cuba Libre,” a crime caper about a cowboy seeking justice in Cuba during the onset of the Spanish-American war. “Cuba libre,” in case you’re not aware, is also another name for a rum and coke!

<p>Chronologically, “The Rum Diary” was the first novel Hunter S. Thompson wrote — as it was based on his time working for a struggling newspaper in Puerto Rico in the 1960s — but it wasn’t actually published until 1998. That was well after Thompson had earned notoriety for his gonzo journalism and books like “Hell’s Angels” and “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.”</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/20_ballpark_foods_you_can_make_at_home_010824/s1__34819277'>20 ballpark foods you can make at home</a></p>

The Rum Diary (1998)

Chronologically, “The Rum Diary” was the first novel Hunter S. Thompson wrote — as it was based on his time working for a struggling newspaper in Puerto Rico in the 1960s — but it wasn’t actually published until 1998. That was well after Thompson had earned notoriety for his gonzo journalism and books like “Hell’s Angels” and “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.”

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<p>First published as a serial novel in a Scottish newspaper, “Espresso Tales” is Alexander McCall Smith’s continuation of “44 Scotland Street,” another serial novel. Both stories center on the amusing everyday lives of Pat MacGregor, her friends, and the people with which she shares an Edinburgh apartment.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

Espresso Tales (2005)

First published as a serial novel in a Scottish newspaper, “Espresso Tales” is Alexander McCall Smith’s continuation of “44 Scotland Street,” another serial novel. Both stories center on the amusing everyday lives of Pat MacGregor, her friends, and the people with which she shares an Edinburgh apartment.

<p>We already had a coffee entry for “Coffee, Tea or Me?” but skipped right over the tea part, so here it is again. “Three Cups of Tea” is a 2006 memoir by Greg Mortenson, who co-founded a non-profit that helped build more than 171 schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Mortenson was hailed as a hero, but he has since tarnished his reputation thanks to some shady financial dealings within the nonprofit.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/the_healthiest_and_unhealthiest_items_from_the_ice_cream_truck_010824/s1__23989816'>The healthiest and unhealthiest items from the ice cream truck</a></p>

Three Cups of Tea (2006)

We already had a coffee entry for “Coffee, Tea or Me?” but skipped right over the tea part, so here it is again. “Three Cups of Tea” is a 2006 memoir by Greg Mortenson, who co-founded a non-profit that helped build more than 171 schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Mortenson was hailed as a hero, but he has since tarnished his reputation thanks to some shady financial dealings within the nonprofit.

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<p>“Water for Elephants,” the story of an old man in a nursing home who recalls how he joined the circus and found the love of his life, is the most famous of Sara Gruen’s novels. Not only did it earn numerous awards and carve out a spot in the New York Times Bestseller List for a dozen weeks in 2006, but it was also adapted into a 2011 feature film starring Robert Pattinson, Reese Witherspoon, and Christoph Waltz. </p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

Water for Elephants (2006)

“Water for Elephants,” the story of an old man in a nursing home who recalls how he joined the circus and found the love of his life, is the most famous of Sara Gruen’s novels. Not only did it earn numerous awards and carve out a spot in the New York Times Bestseller List for a dozen weeks in 2006, but it was also adapted into a 2011 feature film starring Robert Pattinson, Reese Witherspoon, and Christoph Waltz. 

<p>“The Lemonade War” is the name of a trilogy of children’s books by Jacqueline Davies. The eponymous first installment, released in 2007, revolves around a sibling rivalry between Evan and Jessie, who are competing to sell the most lemonade at their respective stands. Although they first focus on solid business tactics, the kids eventually turn to sabotage when the competition gets the better of them.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/21_things_you_didnt_know_about_dunkin_122523/s1__38893501'>21 things you didn’t know about Dunkin’</a></p>

The Lemonade War (2007)

“The Lemonade War” is the name of a trilogy of children’s books by Jacqueline Davies. The eponymous first installment, released in 2007, revolves around a sibling rivalry between Evan and Jessie, who are competing to sell the most lemonade at their respective stands. Although they first focus on solid business tactics, the kids eventually turn to sabotage when the competition gets the better of them.

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<p>Comedian Chelsea Handler has already published six New York Times bestsellers, including the 2008 book “Are You There Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea.” The book is a collection of stories from her life, and the title is a spoof of the book “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret,” which was written by an author we mentioned earlier in this list: Judy Blume.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

Are You There Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea (2008)

Comedian Chelsea Handler has already published six New York Times bestsellers, including the 2008 book “Are You There Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea.” The book is a collection of stories from her life, and the title is a spoof of the book “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret,” which was written by an author we mentioned earlier in this list: Judy Blume.

<p>“The Greatest Beer Run Ever” is the true story of how Chickie Donohue, a former Marine, decided to lift the spirits of his friends fighting in the Vietnam War by delivering beers to them on the front lines. Donohue’s tale didn’t become a book until 2017, but Hollywood wasted no time adapting it into a feature film starring Zac Efron, which was released in 2022.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/lifestyle/articles/22_guilty_pleasure_recipes_to_make_when_you_just_want_to_eat_what_you_want_122623/s1__37483896'>22 guilty pleasure recipes to make when you just want to eat what you want</a></p>

The Greatest Beer Run Ever (2017)

“The Greatest Beer Run Ever” is the true story of how Chickie Donohue, a former Marine, decided to lift the spirits of his friends fighting in the Vietnam War by delivering beers to them on the front lines. Donohue’s tale didn’t become a book until 2017, but Hollywood wasted no time adapting it into a feature film starring Zac Efron, which was released in 2022.

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<p>If you haven’t sampled the works of New York Times bestselling author Darynda Jones, pick up one of the books in the witty and engaging Sunshine Vicram series. The second installment, 2021’s “A Good Day for Chardonnay,” follows Sheriff Vicram as she tries to keep the peace in her small New Mexico town while simultaneously attempting to piece together her own past. It’s suspenseful, a little romantic, and laugh-out-loud funny.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Did you enjoy this slideshow? Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.</a></p>

A Good Day for Chardonnay (2021)

If you haven’t sampled the works of New York Times bestselling author Darynda Jones, pick up one of the books in the witty and engaging Sunshine Vicram series. The second installment, 2021’s “A Good Day for Chardonnay,” follows Sheriff Vicram as she tries to keep the peace in her small New Mexico town while simultaneously attempting to piece together her own past. It’s suspenseful, a little romantic, and laugh-out-loud funny.

Did you enjoy this slideshow? Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive lifestyle content.

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  1. 34 YA Book Titles That Are Mind-Blowingly Creative

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  6. Book Title Generator: 160+ Book Title Ideas 📚

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COMMENTS

  1. Good Books that Begin with E (655 books)

    I started this list to help my fellow readers locate a decent list of books that their titles begin with the letter E. It's for those spell out challenges. flag All Votes Add Books To This List ← Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next → 654 books · 81 voters · list created June 8th, 2012 by Usako (votes) .

  2. Book Title Generator • The Ultimate Bank of 10,000 Titles

    Book Title Generator How to come up with book title ideas Need an original book title, and fast? We got you. Here are 8 ways to come up with book title ideas. 1. Start free writing to find keywords Write absolutely anything that comes into your head: words, phrases, names, places, adjectives — the works.

  3. Reading Guides by Title starting with 'E'

    55 reading guides for book titles starting with "E" Page 1 of 7 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Browse by: Author | Title | Genre | Setting | Time Period | Theme Select your view: Order books by: Easter Island by Jennifer Vanderbes Hardcover: Jun 2003 Paperback: Jun 2004

  4. 50 Books Beginning With E

    1 Early History of Rome (Livy) 2 East of Eden (John Steinbeck) 3 Eat Pray Love (Elizabeth Gilbert) 4 Eats, Shoots and Leaves (Lynne Truss) 5 Eclipse 6 The Edible Woman 7 Eight Cousins (Louisa May Alcott) 8 Eldest 9 Nebraska: Eleanor and Park (Rainbow Rowell) 10 Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine (Gail Honeyman) 11 Electra 12

  5. Book Search: Search for books by title, author, or keyword

    BookBrowse is a selective website featuring some of the best books published in the past 15 years. If you don't find the book or author you're looking for in the first page of results the chances are it's because it is not one that we have featured. More about BookBrowse . Please select a title and/or author, or article in the search options.

  6. Book Title Generator

    Tools & Resources Book Title Generator Find the perfect title for your nonfiction or fiction book with our Book Title Generator. Save time and unleash your creativity by generating a unique and captivating title tailored to your target audience. What is the book genre? Why use a book title generator tool?

  7. 5 Tips for Writing eBook Titles That Get Downloads

    1. Show your audience what's in it for them After putting yourself in your reader's shoes, you need to follow through and deliver value. The best ebook titles show your audience how the ebook will benefit them and what they'll gain as a result. No: Your Guide to Creating Better Blog Posts Yes: 31 Days to Build a Better Blog 2. Grab their attention

  8. How to Title a Book: 13 Steps to Choosing a Title That Sells

    How to Title a Book: 13 Steps to Choosing a Title That Sells By Dave Chesson Last updated on November 1st, 2022 #1 Do book titles matter? #2 #3 To title a book, compose a title that's intriguing, clear, and draws in the readers in your target market. Aim for a discoverable, genre-specific book title.

  9. Google Books

    Books. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books.

  10. Book Title Generator: 1,000+ Book Title Ideas

    With over 1,000 unique book title ideas, you're sure to find the inspiration you need for your next story. Feel free to edit and re-adjust these book titles to suit your own story. Please click the button to generate a random book title. Keep on reading this post for tips on creating your own book title and our free book title generator ...

  11. A List of Book Titles From a

    A list of titles of books I have read, starting with the first five letters of the alphabet - A B C D E. The list starts with "Alias Grace" by Anthony Doerr and ends ...

  12. Advanced Book Search

    Title: Return books with the title: e.g. Books and Culture: Author: Return books written by: e.g. Hamilton Mabie or "Hamilton Wright Mabie" ... Subject: Return books on subject: e.g. Medieval History or "Medieval History" Publication Date: Return content published anytime Return content published between . and e.g. 1999 and 2000, or Jan 1999 ...

  13. 50 Famous Book Titles Taken From Literature

    Famous Book Titles Taken from The Bible. #1. Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner. This quotation for Faulkner's 1936 novel comes from the Books of Samuel - more specifically, 19:4 in 2 Samuel, which is in the Old Testament and relates some of the history of Israel. Absalom, the third son of David, rebelled against his father and was ...

  14. Book Title Generator

    It's designed to support a wide range of works, from fiction and non-fiction to personal memoirs, by understanding and adapting to the core of your narrative. Our service is user-friendly. You have the option to enter a potential title, a summary of your book, or even the full text (up to 100,000 characters). The system will then suggest titles ...

  15. 15 Places To Find E-Books for Free

    ManyBooks offers discounted and free e-books, with more than 50,000 free titles. There is some overlap with Project Gutenberg's offerings, although the ManyBooks website is arguably more user ...

  16. 40 YA Book Titles That Are Mind-Blowingly Creative

    17. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz. This Printz Honor Book is a "tender, honest exploration of identity" ( Publishers Weekly) that distills lyrical truths about family and friendship. Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison.

  17. AI Book Title Generator

    Let our AI do the work for you! Just fill out the form below and we'll generate 10 title options for you. Once you've got the perfect title for your book, we've got 50,000 readers in our newsletter who would love to read it. Get started here.

  18. How To Write Book Titles The Proper Way: A Complete Guide For Writers

    February 10, 2022 Book titles within essays or papers can be tricky. There are specific rules that are given for how to include a book title in a way that sets it apart from the content of your writing given by the Modern Language Association. However, as with many other things in life, there are exceptions to the rules.

  19. An Easy Guide to Naming your E-book For More Sales

    The Title of the E-book. The Title of the E-book has been neglected by Authors and they write something literal like "How to be a Digital Marketer" or "Digital Marketing Tips". This just doesn't work. Even content companies like Buzzfeed test and re-test their titles to see which ones perform better.

  20. Here Are The 2024 Summer Scares Titles For a Summer of ...

    Middle Grade Selections. Ophie's Ghosts by Justina Ireland (Balzer + Bray, 2021) The Nest by Kenneth Oppel (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2015) My Aunt Is A Monster by Reimena Yee (Random House Graphic, 2022) The goal of Summer Scares is to introduce Horror titles to school and public library workers in order to help them start ...

  21. Play Nice by Jason Schreier

    Description. New York Times bestselling author and the gaming industry's preeminent investigative journalist Jason Schreier examines three decades of ups and downs at Blizzard Entertainment leading up to a hostile corporate takeover and a sexual misconduct scandal that put the legendary developer in a world of (Warcraft) trouble.

  22. Book Club reading list: get the titles featured in week two

    Episode Two - the books. Pregnant and homeless at 15, psychologist Katriona O'Sullivan chronicles her struggle to overcome abject poverty, drug addiction and trauma and end up attaining a PhD ...

  23. Best Book Titles (8673 books)

    Listopia Best Book Titles The most eye-catching, clever, or distinctive book titles. flag All Votes Add Books To This List ← Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 … 86 87 Next → 8,673 books · 5,270 voters · list created July 13th, 2008 by Eastofoz (votes) .

  24. Book ban lawsuit moves forward as Florida district removes over ...

    Between January 1 and August 31, 2023, the American Library Association recorded 695 attempts to ban library materials and services, affecting 1,915 different book titles.

  25. Can You Uncover the 10 International Thrillers Hidden in This Text

    This month's Title Search encourages you to discover 10 thrillers with settings around the world. The titles of the novels are hidden below within an unrelated text passage.

  26. 20 drinks mentioned in book titles

    Story by Matt Sulem • 1mo. 1 / 21. 20 drinks mentioned in book titles ©Michael Ochs Archives/GettyImages. Sometimes there's nothing better than relaxing with a good book and a refreshing ...

  27. Romance Novels Begining with the Letter E (130 books)

    Romance Novels Begining with the Letter E. flag. All Votes Add Books To This List. 1. Everything and the Moon (The Lyndon Sisters, #1) by. Julia Quinn (Goodreads Author) 3.76 avg rating — 16,795 ratings. score: 250 , and 3 people voted.